SpaceWatch.TV

JBookmarks

Add to: JBookmarks Add to: Facebook Add to: Webnews Add to: Buzka Add to: Windows Live Add to: Icio Add to: Ximmy Add to: Oneview Add to: Kledy.de Social Bookmarking Add to:  FAV!T Social Bookmarking Add to: Favoriten.de Add to: Seekxl Add to: BoniTrust Add to: Power-Oldie Add to: Bookmarks.cc Add to: Newskick Add to: Newsider Add to: Linksilo Add to: Readster Add to: Yigg Add to: Linkarena Add to: Digg Add to: Del.icoi.us Add to: Reddit Add to: Jumptags Add to: Upchuckr Add to: Simpy Add to: StumbleUpon Add to: Slashdot Add to: Netscape Add to: Furl Add to: Yahoo Add to: Blogmarks Add to: Diigo Add to: Technorati Add to: Newsvine Add to: Blinkbits Add to: Ma.Gnolia Add to: Smarking Add to: Netvouz Add to: Folkd Add to: Spurl Add to: Google Add to: Blinklist Information

Space News Reports

"Glow in Space" --Evidence of A Hot Bubble Left by a Supernova in Our Galactic Neighborhood 10 Million Years Ago
The source of this "diffuse X-ray background" has been debated for the past 50 years. Does it originate from the solar wind colliding with interplanetary gases within our solar system? Or is it born further away, in
Read More 5 Hits 0 Ratings
Image of the Day: Nearby Cosmic Bubble Harbors a Star 100,000 Times More Luminous than the Sun
  The Bubble Nebula or NGC 7635 is 10 light-year diameter object a mere 11,000 light-years away toward the constellation Cassiopeia near a giant molecular cloud which contains the expansion of the
Read More 7 Hits 0 Ratings
"The Youngness Paradox" (Weekend's Most Popular)
Guth says that "the synchronous gauge probability distribution strongly implies that there is no civilization in the visible Universe more advanced than us. We would conclude, therefore, that it is extraordinarily
Read More 5 Hits 0 Ratings
NASA’s Long-Lived Mars Opportunity Rover Sets Off-World Driving Record
[image-36] NASA's Opportunity Mars rover, which landed on the Red Planet in 2004, now holds the off-Earth roving distance record after accruing 25 miles (40 kilometers) of driving. The previous record was held by the Soviet
Read More 5 Hits 0 Ratings
Earth's Alien Habitats--Harbingers of Subsurface Life on Mars?
Microorganisms are much more resilient than we used to think, and that has opened scientists to thinking about life in the ‘subsurface biosphere’. If researchers not limited by sunlight or if they're not limited
Read More 17 Hits 0 Ratings
NASA's Quest for Water on Alien Worlds --"The Holy Grail?"
              A team of astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have gone looking for water vapour in the atmospheres of three planets orbiting stars similar to the Sun – and have come up
Read More 9 Hits 0 Ratings
Image of the Day --A Massive Galaxy Cluster 160 Trillion Times Mass of the Sun
Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have mapped the mass within a galaxy cluster more precisely than ever before. Created using observations from Hubble's Frontier Fields observing programme, the
Read More 12 Hits 0 Ratings
NASA’s Mars Spacecraft Maneuvers to Prepare for Close Comet Flyby
[image-36] NASA is taking steps to protect its Mars orbiters, while preserving opportunities to gather valuable scientific data, as Comet C/2013 A1 Siding Spring heads toward a close flyby of Mars on Oct. 19. The comet’s
Read More 15 Hits 0 Ratings
Hubble Finds Three Surprisingly Dry Exoplanets
Get larger image formats Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope have gone looking for water vapor in the atmospheres of three planets orbiting stars similar to the Sun and have come up nearly dry. The planets
Read More 13 Hits 0 Ratings
Hunt for Missing 27% of the Universe Intensifies
Physicists believe dark matter could be made of difficult-to-detect particles called Weakly Interacting Massive Particles or WIMPs, which usually pass through ordinary matter without leaving a trace. The current LUX
Read More 24 Hits 0 Ratings
"Mapping Dark Energy's Impact on the Universe" --The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Phase 4
“The power of a large survey is that there may be surprises we weren’t planning on, and that means learning something really new,” said C. Megan Urry, Yale’s Israel Munson Professor of Astronomy and
Read More 23 Hits 0 Ratings
"Explosive Microbial Growth Caused Earth's Greatest Extinction Event" --The Great Dying (Today's Most Popular)
The end-Permian (or PT) extinction event occurred 252 million years ago. It is often called the Great Dying because around 90 percent of marine species disappeared in one fell swoop. Similar numbers died on land as
Read More 21 Hits 0 Ratings
Hubble Sees Spiral Bridge of Young Stars Between Two Ancient Galaxies
Get larger image formats It seems like our compulsive universe can be downright capricious when it comes to making oddball-looking things in the cosmos. The latest surprise to Hubble astronomers is a
Read More 18 Hits 0 Ratings
Black Hole Fireworks in Nearby Galaxy 06 July 2014, 22.32 Space
Black Hole Fireworks in Nearby Galaxy
A galaxy about 23 million light-years away is the site of impressive, ongoing, fireworks. Rather than paper, powder, and fire, this galactic light show involves a giant black hole, shock waves, and vast reservoirs of gas.
Read More 41 Hits 0 Ratings
Comet Pan-STARRS Marches Across the Sky 06 July 2014, 22.32 Space
Comet Pan-STARRS Marches Across the Sky
NASA's NEOWISE mission captured a series of infrared images of comet C/2012 K1 -- also referred to as comet Pan-STARRS -- as it swept across our skies in May 2014. › Full image and caption July 03, 2014 NASA's
Read More 37 Hits 0 Ratings
Newfound Frozen World Orbits in Binary Star System
This artist's rendering shows a newly discovered planet (far right) orbiting one star (right) of a binary star system. The discovery, made by a collaboration of international research teams and led by researchers at The Ohio
Read More 44 Hits 0 Ratings
OCO-2 Takes the A-Train to Study Earth's Atmosphere
OCO-2 will become the leader of the Afternoon Constellation, or A-Train, as shown in this artist's concept. Japan's Global Change Observation Mission - Water (GCOM-W1) satellite and NASA's Aqua, CALIPSO, CloudSat and Aura
Read More 41 Hits 0 Ratings
NASA Radio Delivered for Europe's 2016 Mars Orbiter
The European Space Agency's ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter, being assembled in France for a 2016 launch, will carry two Electra UHF relay radios provided by NASA. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ESA/TAS › Full image and caption
Read More 42 Hits 0 Ratings
Spectacular Southern Lights, Shooting Stars, Sahara Snapshots and more from ESA’s Alexander Gerst aboard ISS
Want to stay on top of all the space news? Follow @universetoday on Twitter “Saw a beautiful Southern Light last night. I so wish you could see this with your own eyes!” Image taken from the International Space Station
Read More 47 Hits 0 Ratings
Sketches of Saturn: Ringed Planet Dances In Raw Cassini Images
by Elizabeth Howell on July 7, 2014 Want to stay on top of all the space news? Follow @universetoday on Twitter A hexagonal storm on Saturn rages in this Cassini image taken July 2, 2014. Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science
Read More 38 Hits 0 Ratings
Mars ‘Sky Crane’ Revisited? Rover Prototype Drops To Ground Safely In European Tests
by Elizabeth Howell on July 7, 2014 Want to stay on top of all the space news? Follow @universetoday on Twitter How do you land a machine on the Red Planet? Appears that the answer keeps changing as engineers get smarter
Read More 42 Hits 0 Ratings
New Horizons Enters ‘Pluto-Space!’ To Celebrate, Here Are Pictures Of The Dwarf Planet
Want to stay on top of all the space news? Follow @universetoday on Twitter New Horizons spacecraft. Image Credit: NASA After almost nine years on the road, New Horizons is in what NASA calls “Pluto-space”! Earlier today
Read More 58 Hits 0 Ratings
Carnival of Space #361 06 July 2014, 22.31 Space
Carnival of Space #361
by Susie Murph on July 7, 2014 Want to stay on top of all the space news? Follow @universetoday on Twitter Carnival of Space. Image by Jason Major. This week’s Carnival of Space is hosted by Mika McKinnon at the io9
Read More 169 Hits 0 Ratings
Virtual Summer Camp Alert! Maker Camp Kicks Off Today
by Elizabeth Howell on July 7, 2014 Want to stay on top of all the space news? Follow @universetoday on Twitter Logo for MakerCamp. If you’re a high school student who’s really into space, Maker Camp bills itself as
Read More 32 Hits 0 Ratings
Ocean on Saturn Moon Could be as Salty as the Dead Sea
[image-36]Scientists analyzing data from NASA’s Cassini mission have firm evidence the ocean inside Saturn's largest moon, Titan, might be as salty as the Earth's Dead Sea. The new results come from a study of gravity and
Read More 21 Hits 0 Ratings
Hubble to Proceed with Full Search for New Horizons Targets
Get larger image formats Planetary scientists have successfully used the Hubble Space Telescope to boldly look out to the far frontier of the solar system to find suitable targets for NASA's New Horizons mission to Pluto.
Read More 20 Hits 0 Ratings
NASA Set to Launch OCO-2 Observatory on July 1 – Sniffer of Carbon Dioxide Greenhouse Gas
Want to stay on top of all the space news? Follow @universetoday on Twitter NASA’s Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) at the Launch PadThis black-and-white infrared view shows the launch gantry, surrounding the United
Read More 25 Hits 0 Ratings
NASA’s Orion Deep Space Capsule Completes Most Complex  Parachute Test Ahead of Maiden Launch
Want to stay on top of all the space news? Follow @universetoday on Twitter A test version of NASA’s Orion manned spacecraft descends under its three main parachutes above the U.S. Army Proving Ground in Arizona in the
Read More 35 Hits 0 Ratings
First LDSD Test Flight a Success 29 June 2014, 15.19 Space
First LDSD Test Flight a Success
June 29, 2014 NASA representatives participated in a media teleconference this morning to discuss the June 28, 2014 near-space test flight of the agency's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD), which occurred off the coast
Read More 35 Hits 0 Ratings
Media Telecon: NASA Supersonic Test Flight Completed
A screen shot shows the LDSD test vehicle after it dropped from the balloon that lifted it to high altitudes and fired its rocket. The picture was taken by a low-resolution camera onboard the vehicle. Earth is the blue-green
Read More 39 Hits 0 Ratings
NASA's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator Lifts Off
The launch tower helps link the Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator test vehicle to a balloon; once the balloon floats up, the vehicle is released from the tower and the balloon carries it to high altitudes. The vehicle's
Read More 49 Hits 0 Ratings
"Gravity is Driving Growth of the Universe" --Astronomers Confirm via 600,000 Galaxies
Samushia and his colleagues analysed more than 600,000 galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) Baryon Oscillations Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) catalogue to come up with a measurement of how much
Read More 33 Hits 0 Ratings
'The Youngness Paradox' --"Why SETI has Not Found Any Signals from Extraterrestrial Civilizations” (Weekend Feature)
Guth says that "the synchronous gauge probability distribution strongly implies that there is no civilization in the visible Universe more advanced than us. We would conclude, therefore, that it is extraordinarily
Read More 106 Hits 0 Ratings
Force Needed to Measure Gravitational Waves Detected for 1st Time --"Small as One Thousandth the Diameter of a Proton"
This week, what is believed to be the smallest force ever measured has been detected by researchers with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the University of California (UC) Berkeley. Using
Read More 77 Hits 0 Ratings
Fossil Discovery Shows The Antarctic Icecap is 33.6 million Years Old (Today's Most Popular)
    The Antarctic continental ice cap came into existence during the Oligocene epoch, some 33.6 million years ago, according to data from a 2013 international expedition led by the Andalusian Institute of
Read More 40 Hits 0 Ratings

SpaceWatch.TV

 

Future News Reports

Obama's War Against US Energy Independence:  Give Away Oil Rich Alaskan Islands to Russia!
  By Joe Miller The Obama administration, despite the nation’s economic woes, effectively killed the job-producing Keystone Pipeline last month. The Arab Spring is turning the oil production of Libya and other Arab
Read More 2375 Hits 0 Ratings
OSBIT Power's MaXccess system completes successful offshore trials 08 April 2012, 02.33 Administrator Energy
OSBIT Power's MaXccess system completes successful offshore trials
OSBIT Power's MaXccess system completes successful offshore trials Visit http://www.osbitpower.com for further information OSBIT Power (OP), Siemens Wind Power and Statoil have successfully completed offshore
Read More 2145 Hits 0 Ratings
North America's EV charging infrastructure to get a boost 12 January 2012, 02.01 Administrator Energy
North America's EV charging infrastructure to get a boost
        North America’s EV charging infrastructure may soon see significant improvements, thanks to a recent agreement between Eaton Corporation and Coulomb Technologies. Under the deal, Eaton’s Level II and
Read More 2006 Hits 0 Ratings
Could The Gravitomagnetic Field Be The Ultimate Energy Source? 28 May 2011, 01.34 Administrator Energy
Could The Gravitomagnetic Field Be The Ultimate Energy Source?
      Have scientists already unknowingly discovered the source for all atomic energy reactions, and could the discovery of the gravitomagnetic field be the ultimate energy source?  What if our understandings on how
Read More 4568 Hits 2 Ratings
Physicists urge caution over apparent speed of light violation 25 September 2011, 16.27 Administrator Energy
Physicists urge caution over apparent speed of light violation
Physicists wary of junking light speed limit yet Physicist Antonio Ereditato poses before presenting the result of an experiment, which found a subatomic particle, the neutrino, seemed to move faster than the speed of
Read More 2954 Hits 0 Ratings
STEORN ORBO  FREE ENERGY:  What's Next a Self Charging Unit for your Electric Car?
Steorn's Free Energy Orbo -- From Permanent Magnets to Solid State Systems   My associate, Hank Mills composed this for PESN, Saturday, February 12, 2011 6:17 Steorn is a small company based in Dublin, Ireland. For
Read More 4900 Hits 1 Rating
Cold Fusion, Releases Energy from Hydrogen's Gravitomagnetic Field 16 January 2011, 09.17 Administrator Energy
Cold Fusion, Releases Energy  from Hydrogen's Gravitomagnetic Field
Cold Fusion "In Bologna we did it" By Ilaria VENTURI, La Republica News, Bolona, Italy For the first time in Italy, in front of experts, the process was carried out using nickel and hydrogen. It 's the way to achieve
Read More 3690 Hits 0 Ratings
Abu Dhabi Media Zone to generate renewable energy through its façade
Eco Factor: Sustainable development to generate renewable solar energy. Bernard Tschumi Architects have re-imagined their master plan for the new Abu Dhabi Media Zone, by incorporating several environmentally-friendly
Read More 2768 Hits 0 Ratings

FUTURE NEWS NETWORK


Change The World!


Latest Published Articles

Space

NASA Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator Set to Lift Off PDF Print E-mail

This artist's concept shows the test vehicle for NASA's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD), designed to test landing technologies for future Mars missions. This artist's concept shows the test vehicle for NASA's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD), designed to test landing technologies for future Mars missions. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
› Full image and caption
  • submit to reddit

June 27, 2014

Mission managers are proceeding with preparations for a launch attempt tomorrow morning, Saturday, June 28, of a high-altitude balloon carrying the Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) test vehicle to the edge of space. The text will occur at the U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kauai, Hawaii.

At present, weather forecasted for tomorrow morning is within launch constraints. Mission managers will evaluate latest weather conditions later this evening to confirm favorable conditions.

The Saturday balloon launch window extends from approximately 11:15 a.m. to noon PDT (8:15 a.m. to 9 a.m. HST). The balloon will take approximately 2 to 3 hours to achieve float conditions. Shortly thereafter, the test vehicle will be released from the balloon and the test will begin.

Check back here and on our Twitter sites: @NASA_Technology, @NASA, @NASAJPL and @NASA_Marshall to get the latest updates on the mission.

NASA will stream live video of the test via Ustream at:

http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl2

The video may be intermittent based on test activities. For real-time updates, and more information, reporters should consult:

http://go.usa.gov/kzZQ

NASA plans on providing edited supporting video of the test the day after flight.

For NASA TV streaming video, schedules and downlink information, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

NASA's LDSD program is part of the agency's Space Technology Mission Directorate, which is innovating, developing, testing and flying hardware for use in NASA's future missions.

DC Agle/Whitney Clavin Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. 818-393-9011/818-354-4673 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it / This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it David Steitz NASA Headquarters, Washington
202-236-5829
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Stefan Alford
Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii
808-335-4740
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

2014-207

Share
  Section:  Articles - File Under:  Space  |  
 
Five Things about OCO-2 PDF Print E-mail

Engineers connected the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 Engineers connected the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) to a crane at California¹s Vandenberg Air Force Base on June 14, preparing to mate it to a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket.
› Full image and caption
  • submit to reddit

June 27, 2014

The Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) is scheduled to launch July 1 from California's Vandenberg Air Force Base. OCO-2 is NASA's first mission dedicated to studying atmospheric carbon dioxide, the leading human-produced greenhouse gas driving changes in Earth's climate.

1. Humans release nearly 40 billion tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere annually. The amount varies from nation to nation, but that averages about 5.5 tons per person. Earth's land surface and ocean absorb about half of these emissions. OCO-2's measurements will show scientists where this carbon dioxide comes from (the sources on Earth) and where it is absorbed out of the atmosphere and stored (the sinks).

2. OCO-2's field of view is only about one square mile (three square kilometers) -- smaller than New York City's Central Park. Why so small? To dodge clouds. Clouds regularly cover about two-thirds of Earth, but even a tiny wisp of cloud in OCO-2's view compromises the measurement.

3. OCO-2 studies carbon dioxide by looking at the colors (or wavelengths) of sunlight that carbon dioxide absorbs. To identify very small changes in this absorption from one wavelength to the next, the OCO-2 instrument separates light into many narrow bands of wavelengths. In three wavelength regions, which represent only a small portion of the spectrum, it can measure more than 3,000 individual bands. A camera divides the same range of wavelengths into just three colors.

4. OCO-2 will collect 24 measurements every second, totaling about a million soundings every day. Of these, about 100,000 are expected to be sufficiently cloud free to provide highly useable carbon dioxide data. The best carbon dioxide-observing satellite currently in orbit takes 4 seconds to make one sounding and collects fewer than 20,000 pieces of data per day, with about 500 of those being highly useful.

5. The observatory has just a 30-second opportunity to launch. The timing has to be so precise because OCO-2 will join the A-Train, a constellation of five other international Earth observing satellites that fly very close together to make nearly simultaneous measurements of our planet. Launching a few seconds too early or late will prevent it from joining the right orbit track. If it misses its 30-second opportunity on July 1, it can launch during exactly the same 30-second window on a succeeding night.

For more information on OCO-2, see:

http://www.nasa.gov/oco-2

For more information about NASA's Earth science activities in 2014, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/earthrightnow

Alan Buis
818-354-0474
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Written by Rosalie Murphy
JPL Earth Science and Technology Directorate

2014-206

Share
  Section:  Articles - File Under:  Space  |  
 
NASA's Curiosity Rover Team Today Features Women PDF Print E-mail

Some of the women working on NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Project Some of the women working on NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Project, which built and operates the Curiosity Mars rover, gathered for this photo in the Mars Yard used for rover testing at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
› Larger image
  • submit to reddit

June 26, 2014

NASA's Curiosity Mars rover this week completed its first Martian year -- 687 Earth days -- since landing in August 2012. Each day of the rover working on Mars requires several dozen rover team members completing tasks on Earth.

To celebrate reaching this longevity milestone, which had been set as one of the mission's goals from the start, the Curiosity team planned staffing a special day, with women fulfilling 76 out of 102 operational roles.

"I see this as a chance to illustrate to girls and young women that there's not just a place for them in technical fields, but a wide range of jobs and disciplines that are part of the team needed for a project as exciting as a rover on Mars," said Colette Lohr, an engineer at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California.

"There's no practical way any one person could learn all the disciplines needed for operating Curiosity," she said. "It takes a team and we rely on each other."

Disciplines range from soil science to software engineering, from chemistry to cartography, in duties ranging from assessing rover-temperature data freshly arriving from Mars to choosing where to point the rover's cameras. Descriptions of the roles, along with names and locations of the team members filling them today, are part of Curiosity Women's Day information available at:

http://go.usa.gov/9d3x

Lohr's role today is strategic mission manager, which means she is responsible for review and approval of plans being developed and modified during the day for rover activities more than three or four days in the future.

She and most of the other engineers and managers on the team are at JPL in California. Today's team, not atypically, also includes members working in 11 other U.S. states, from Massachusetts to Montana, and four other nations: Canada, France, Russia and Spain. Each of the rover's 10 science instruments has people responsible for evaluating newly received data and planning to get more data. Other scientists participating in operations serve on theme groups that pull together information from multiple instruments and choose priorities for upcoming activities.

Curiosity Deputy Project Scientist Joy Crisp of JPL helped organize the special day and will fill the project scientist role, providing scientific leadership in the strategic planning process. She said, "The team has both scientists and engineers, but it's one team working together to accomplish the mission goals."

Each day's rover activities must be planned to fit within budgets of how much time, power and data-downlink capacity are available.

The operational roles fall into categories of tactical, supra-tactical and strategic, which focus, respectively, on the next day's rover activities, the activities two to five days ahead, and planning for weeks or months ahead.

"While some people are focused on today's plan for tomorrow, we need other people to be looking further ahead," Crisp said. "We wouldn't be able to plan complex activities for the rover if we started from scratch each day. We do a lot of work to get a head start on each day."

The operations team for Curiosity is larger than the operations teams for the previous generation of rovers, NASA's Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity. In an experience similar to Women's Curiosity Day, one day in February 2008, Spirit's tactical operations team of about 30 people was almost entirely women.

NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Project is using Curiosity to assess ancient habitable environments and major changes in Martian environmental conditions. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, built the rover and manages the project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington.

For more information about Curiosity, visit:

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/msl , http://www.nasa.gov/msl and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/

You can follow the mission on Facebook and Twitter at:

http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity

http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity

Guy Webster 818-354-6278
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

2014-205

Share
  Section:  Articles - File Under:  Space  |  
 
NASA's OCO-2 Will Track Our Impact on Airborne Carbon PDF Print E-mail

Fossil fuel burning and other human activities are the primary source for the rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide. Fossil fuel burning and other human activities are the primary source for the rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide. NASA's OCO-2 mission will help sort out the gas's sources and reservoirs. Image credit: Wikimedia Commons
› Larger image
  • submit to reddit

June 25, 2014

Every time we get in a car and drive, we burn gasoline, releasing carbon dioxide and other compounds into the air and disturbing Earth's climate. Our use of fossil fuels continues to increase exponentially, with more than half of all fossil fuels ever used by humans being consumed in the last 20 years.

In comparison with the amount of carbon that enters the atmosphere from natural sources, our fossil fuel emissions are modest. "Carbon dioxide generated by human activities amounts to only a few percent of the total yearly atmospheric uptake or loss of carbon dioxide from plant life and geochemical processes on land and in the ocean," said Gregg Marland, a professor in the Geology Department of Appalachian State University, Boone, North Carolina. "This may not seem like much, but humans have essentially tipped the balance."

Scientists are able to accurately measure the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, both today and in the past, and the impact of our activities is apparent in those measurements. Before the Industrial Revolution, there were about 280 molecules of carbon dioxide out of every million molecules in the atmosphere, that is, 280 parts per million. By 2014, the concentration had risen to about 400 parts per million.

Although we know the concentration of carbon dioxide, much about the processes that govern the gas's atmospheric concentration remains a mystery. We still do not know precisely where all of the carbon dioxide comes from and where it is being stored when it leaves the air. That information is crucial for understanding the impact of human activities on climate and for evaluating options for mitigating or adapting to climate change.

Scientists expect to get some answers soon to these and other compelling carbon questions, thanks to the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2, a new Earth-orbiting NASA satellite scheduled to launch on July 1. OCO-2 will allow scientists to record detailed daily measurements of carbon dioxide -- around 100,000 measurements of the gas around the world every day.

"Now that humans are acknowledging the environmental effects of our dependence on fossil fuels and other carbon dioxide-emitting activities, our goal is to analyze the sources and sinks of this carbon dioxide and to find better ways to manage it," Marland said.

"If you visualize a column of air that stretches from Earth's surface to the top of the atmosphere, the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 will identify how much of that vertical column is carbon dioxide, with an understanding that most is emitted at the surface," said Marland. "Simply, it will act like a plane observing the smoke from forest fires down below, with the task of assessing where the fires are and how big they are. Compare that aerial capability with sending a lot of people into the forest looking for fires. The observatory will use its vantage point from space to capture a picture of where the sources and sinks of carbon dioxide are, rather than our cobbling data together from multiple sources with less frequency, reliability and detail."

Kevin Gurney, an associate professor at Arizona State University, Tempe, believes OCO-2 will complement a suite of NASA-funded efforts he is currently leading that quantify fossil fuel emissions by using statistics on fuel, activity of cars, etc., to pinpoint emissions on scales as small as an individual city building or street.

"This research and OCO-2 together will act like partners in closing the carbon budget, with my data products estimating movements from the bottom up and OCO-2 estimating sources from the top down," Gurney said. "By tackling the problem from both perspectives, we'll stand to achieve an independent, mutually compatible view of the carbon cycle. And the insight gained by combining these top-down and bottom-up approaches might take on special significance in the near future as our policymakers consider options for regulating carbon dioxide across the entire globe."

For more about OCO-2, visit these sites:

http://www.nasa.gov/oco-2/

http://oco.jpl.nasa.gov/

OCO-2 is the second of five NASA Earth science launches in 2014, the most in more than a decade. NASA monitors Earth's vital signs from land, air and space with a fleet of satellites and ambitious airborne and ground-based observation campaigns. NASA develops new ways to observe and study Earth's interconnected natural systems with long-term data records and computer analysis tools to better see how our planet is changing. The agency shares this unique knowledge with the global community and works with institutions in the United States and around the world that contribute to understanding and protecting our home planet.

For more information about NASA's Earth science activities in 2014, see: http://www.nasa.gov/earthrightnow

Alan Buis
818-354-0474
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

2014-204

Share
  Section:  Articles - File Under:  Space  |  
 
NASA Sets New Dates for Saucer-Shaped Test Vehicle Flight PDF Print E-mail

This artist's concept shows the test vehicle for NASA's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD), designed to test landing technologies for future Mars missions. This artist's concept shows the test vehicle for NASA's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD), designed to test landing technologies for future Mars missions. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
› Full image and caption
  • submit to reddit

June 25, 2014

NASA's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project plans to fly its rocket-powered, saucer-shaped landing technology test vehicle into near-space from the U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF) on Kauai, Hawaii, later this week.

NASA has identified five potential launch dates for the high-altitude balloon carrying the LDSD experiment: June 28, 29, 30, July 1 and 3. The launch window for Saturday, June 28 extends from 8:15 to 9:30 a.m. Hawaii Standard Time (11:15 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. PDT / 2:15 to 3:30 p.m. EDT).

The test will be carried live via Ustream and simulcast on NASA Television.

The vehicle originally was scheduled for its first test flight earlier in June, but unacceptable weather conditions prevented the launch.

Decisions to attempt launch of the LDSD test will be made the day before each launch opportunity date. NASA will issue launch advisories via the mission website, media advisories and on Twitter at:

https://twitter.com/NASA_Technology and https://twitter.com/NASA

NASA will stream live video of the test via Ustream at: http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl2

The video may be intermittent based on test activities. Consult the LDSD website for real-time updates of the test.

For NASA TV streaming video, schedules and downlink information, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

After the balloon reaches an altitude of 120,000 feet, the rocket-powered test vehicle will be dropped. Seconds later, its motor will fire, carrying it to 180,000 feet and as fast as about Mach 3.8. LDSD carries several onboard cameras.

More information about the LDSD space technology demonstration mission is online at: http://go.usa.gov/kzZQ

NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate funds the LDSD mission, a cooperative effort led by JPL. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, manages LDSD within the Technology Demonstration Mission Program Office. NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Wallops Island, Virginia, is coordinating support with the Pacific Missile Range Facility and providing the balloon systems for the LDSD test.

For more information about the Space Technology Mission Directorate, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/spacetech

DC Agle
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
818-393-9011
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

David Steitz
Headquarters, Washington
202-236-5829 or 202-358-1730
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Shannon Ridinger
Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala.
256-544-3774 or 256-541-7698
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Stefan Alford Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii
808-335-4740
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

2014-202

Share
  Section:  Articles - File Under:  Space  |  
 
NASA's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator to Lift Off June 28 PDF Print E-mail

The launch tower helps link the Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator test vehicle to a balloon The launch tower helps link the Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator test vehicle to a balloon; once the balloon floats up, the vehicle is released from the tower and the balloon carries it to high altitudes. The vehicle's rocket will take it to even higher altitudes, where the supersonic test begins. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
› Full image and caption
  • submit to reddit

June 27, 2014

A balloon carrying a test vehicle for NASA's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) is scheduled to lift off Saturday, June 28, from its pad at the U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kauai, Hawaii, during a launch window that opens at 8:15 a.m. Hawaii Standard Time (11:15 a.m. PDT/2:15 p.m. EDT). The vehicle, which resembles a flying saucer, is designed to test landing technologies for future Mars missions.

This first of three LDSD flights will determine the flying qualities of the test vehicle. As a bonus, the flight plan also includes deployment of two new technologies -- an inflatable device and mammoth parachute. However, those landing technologies are not officially scheduled to be tested until next summer, in two additional LDSD flights.

After liftoff, the balloon carrying the LDSD test vehicle will slowly float upward, taking several hours to reach an altitude of 120,000 feet (36,600 meters). At that point, the balloon will release the vehicle and its rocket will kick in, boosting the craft to an altitude of 180,000 feet (54,900 meters).

When the test vehicle reaches 180,000 feet and is traveling at about Mach 3.8, it will deploy the first of the new technologies, a doughnut-shaped tube called the Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD). The SIAD decelerates the test vehicle to approximately Mach 2.5. The test vehicle will then deploy a mammoth parachute (the Supersonic Disk Sail Parachute), which will carry it safely to a controlled water impact about 40 minutes after being dropped from the balloon.

The website will be updated as event milestones occur, at the top of the page.

More information on LDSD is online at:

http://go.usa.gov/kzZQ

NASA's LDSD program is part of the agency's Space Technology Mission Directorate, which is innovating, developing, testing and flying hardware for use in NASA's future missions.

DC Agle Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. 818-393-9011 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it David Steitz NASA Headquarters, Washington
202-236-5829
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Stefan Alford
Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii
808-335-4740
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

2014-208

Share
  Section:  Articles - File Under:  Space  |  
 
Support a Good Cause To Win a Trip To Space PDF Print E-mail

Want to stay on top of all the space news? Follow @universetoday on Twitter

XCOR Aerospace's Lynx suborbital vehicle is designed to fly to 328,000 feet (Credit: XCOR)

XCOR Aerospace’s Lynx Mark II suborbital vehicle is designed to fly to 328,000 feet (Credit: XCOR)

Well, technically not space*, but suborbital, and that’d still be way cool! And what’s even cooler is that you can enter to win a trip on an XCOR Lynx Mark II suborbital flight while helping to support a good cause of your choice, courtesy of The Urgency Network’s “Ticket to Rise” campaign. Check out the dramatic spaceflight-packed promotional video and find out how to enter below:

The Urgency Network is an online platform whereby participants can win experience-based prizes by participating in campaigns that are designed to aid and support good causes, many of which assist specific communities in need, awareness groups, and conservation efforts. You earn “entries” for prize drawings by purchasing gift packages from the participating foundations or by donating time, social media presence, or money directly. It’s a way for organizations that might not have (or be able to afford) a large PR department to get funded and gain widespread exposure. Learn more about The Urgency Network here.

In the Ticket to Rise campaign, the grand prize is beyond stratospheric — literally! One lucky winner will experience a ride aboard an XCOR Lynx Mark II suborbital craft, a single-stage space vehicle that takes off from a runway to ultimately coast briefly at a maximum altitude of 328,000 feet (about 100 km), experiencing 4 minutes of microgravity before re-entry and a runway landing. It’s a supersonic 30-minute flight to the very edge of space!

(*Actually, 100 km is right at the von Karman line, so riding the Lynx Mark II past that could qualify you as an astronaut. Just sayin’.)

How a Lynx Mark II flight works (Source: XCOR)

How a Lynx Mark II flight works (Source: XCOR)

Screen Shot 2014-06-26 at 12.53.52 PMAdd to that you’d be helping any one of dozens of good causes (you can choose from different ones by clicking the “Select a Different NonProfit” text link on the donation page) and it’s a win-win for everyone. And even if you don’t get a seat aboard a spaceship (many will enter, few will win) you can still get some pretty awesome promo offers from the organizations as bulk-entry packages.

Click here to sign up and enter the Ticket to Rise campaign.

The deadline to enter the campaign is 11:59:59 p.m. EDT August 11, 2014. Drawing will be held on August 12. The Lynx flight is dependent on meeting all requirements and passing physical exams and tests by XCOR Aerospace, and although the date is expected to be in the fall of 2015, this is rocket science and things change. Read the official rules for all details.

About 

A graphic designer in Rhode Island, Jason writes about space exploration on his blog Lights In The Dark, Discovery News, and, of course, here on Universe Today. Ad astra!

Tagged as: donate, Lynx, spaceflight, support, Ticket to Rise, Urgency Network, win a trip to space, XCOR

Share
  Section:  Articles - File Under:  Space  |  
 
Has the Cosmology Standard Model become a Rube Goldberg Device? PDF Print E-mail

Want to stay on top of all the space news? Follow @universetoday on Twitter

Artists illustration of the expansion of the Universe (Credit: NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center)

Artists illustration of the expansion of the Universe (Credit: NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center)

This week at the Royal Astronomical Society’s National Astronomy Meeting in the UK, physicists are challenging the evidence for the recent BICEP2 results regarding the inflation period of the Universe, announced just 90 days ago. New research is laying doubt upon the inclusion of inflation theory in the Standard Cosmological Model for understanding the forces of nature, the nature of elementary particles and the present state of the known Universe.

Back on March 17, 2014, it seemed the World was offered a glimpse of an ultimate order from eons ago … actually from the beginning of time. BICEP2, the single purpose machine at the South Pole delivered an image that after analysis, and subtraction of estimated background signal from the Milky Way, lead its researchers to conclude that they had found the earliest remnant from the birth of the Universe, a signature in ancient light that supported the theory of Inflation.

 BICEP2 Telescope at twilight at the South Pole, Antartica (Credit: Steffen Richter, Harvard University)

BICEP2 Telescope at twilight at the South Pole, Antarctica (Credit: Steffen Richter, Harvard University)

Thirty years ago, the Inflation theory was conceived by physicists Alan Guth and Andei Linde. Guth, Linde and others realized that a sudden expansion of the Universe at only 1/1000000000000000000000000000000000th of a second after the Big Bang could solve some puzzling mysteries of the Cosmos. Inflation could explain the uniformity of the cosmic background radiation. While images such as from the COBE satellite show a blotchy distribution of radiation, in actuality, these images accentuate extremely small variations in the background radiation, remnants from the Big Bang, variations on the order of 1/100,000th of the background level.

Note that the time of the Universe’s proposed Inflationary period immediately after the Big Bang would today permit light to travel only 1/1000000000000000th of the diameter of the Hydrogen atom. The Universe during this first moment of expansion was encapsulated in a volume far smaller than the a single atom.

Emotions ran very high when the BICEP2 team announced their findings on March 17 of this year. The inflation event that the background radiation data supported is described as a supercooling of the Cosmos however, there were physicists that simply remained cool and remained contrarians to the theory. Noted British Physicist Sir Roger Primrose was one who remained underwhelmed and stated that the incredible circular polarization of light that remained in the processed data from BICEP2 could be explained by the interaction of dust, light and magnetic fields in our own neighborhood, the Milky Way.

Illustration of the ESA Planck Telescope in Earth orbit (Credit: ESA)

Illustration of the ESA Planck Telescope in Earth orbit (Credit: ESA)

Now, new observations from another detector, one on the Planck Satellite orbiting the Earth, is revealing that the contribution of background radiation from local sources, the dust in the Milky Way, is appearing to have been under-estimated by the BICEP2 team. All the evidence is not yet laid out but the researchers are now showing reservations. At the same time, it does not dismiss the Inflation Theory. It means that more observations are needed and probably with greater sensitivity.

So why ask the question, are physicists constructing a Rube Goldberg device?

Our present understanding of the Universe stands upon what is called “the Standard Model” of Cosmology. At the Royal Astronomical Society meeting this week, the discussions underfoot could be revealing a Standard Model possibly in a state of collapse or simply needing new gadgets and mechanisms to remain the best theory of everything.

Also this week, new data further supports the discovery of the Higg’s Boson by the Large Hadron Collider in 2012, the elementary particle whose existence explains the mass of fundamental particles in nature and that supports the existence of the Higgs Field vital to robustness of the Standard Model. However, the Higgs related data is also revealing that if the inflationary period of the Universe did take place, then if taken with the Standard Model, one can conclude that the Universe should have collapsed upon itself and our very existence today would not be possible.

A Rube Goldberg Toothpaste dispenser as also the state of the Standard Model (Credit: R.Goldberg)

A Rube Goldberg Toothpaste dispenser as also the state of the Standard Model (Credit: R.Goldberg)

Dr. Brian Green, a researcher in the field of Super String Theory and M-Theory and others such as Dr. Stephen Hawking, are quick to state that the Standard Model is an intermediary step towards a Grand Unified Theory of everything, the Universe. The contortion of the Standard Model, into a sort of Rube Goldberg device can be explained by the undaunting accumulation of more acute and diverse observations at cosmic and quantum scales.

Discussions at the Royal Astronomical Society meeting are laying more doubts upon the inflation theory which just 90 days ago appeared so well supported by BICEP2 – data derived by truly remarkable cutting edge electronics developed by NASA and researchers at the California Institute of Technology. The trials and tribulations of these great theories to explain everything harken back to the period just prior to Einstein’s Miracle Year, 1905. Fragmented theories explaining separately the forces of nature were present but also the accumulation of observational data had reached a flash point.

Today, observations from BICEP2, NASA and ESA great space observatories, sensitive instruments buried miles underground and carefully contrived quantum experiments in laboratories are making the Standard Model more stressed in explaining everything, the same model so well supported by the Higg’s Boson discovery just two years ago. Cosmologists concede that we may never have a complete, proven theory of everything, one that is elegant; however, the challenges upon the Standard Model and inflation will surely embolden younger theorists to double the efforts in other theoretical work.

For further reading:
RAS NAM press release: Should the Higgs Boson Have Caused our Universe To Collapse?
We’ve Discovered Inflation!: Now What?
Cosmologists Cast Doubt on Inflation Evidence
Are the BICEP2 Results Invalid? Probably Not

About 

Contributing writer Tim Reyes is a former NASA software engineer and analyst who has supported development of orbital and lander missions to the planet Mars since 1992. He has an M.S. in Space Plasma Physics from University of Alabama, Huntsville.

Tagged as: BICEP2, Cosmology, inflation, standard model

Share
  Section:  Articles - File Under:  Space  |  
 
Nature & Man in One Astrophoto: Iridium Flare, Milky Way, Clouds and Light Pollution PDF Print E-mail

Want to stay on top of all the space news? Follow @universetoday on Twitter

An Iridium Flare flashes over western Maine in this beautiful night sky image from June 2014. Credit and copyright: Mike Taylor/Taylor Photography.

An Iridium Flare flashes over western Maine in this beautiful night sky image from June 2014. Credit and copyright: Mike Taylor/Taylor Photography.

Ever seen a flash in the night sky and wondered if you were seeing things? Iridium flares are often mistaken for meteors because of their notable bright flashes of light in the night sky but they are actually caused by a specific group of satellites that orbit our planet. The Iridium communication satellites are just in the right orbit that when sunlight reflects on their antennas, a flash — or flare — is visible down on Earth. There are currently about 66 Iridium satellites in orbit, so flares are a rather common occurrence.

This image from photographer Mike Taylor is one frame from a timelapse of the Milky Way and other features of the night sky in motion against a silhouetted foreground. “Photographed from western Maine, this shot includes quite a bit of light pollution and some fast moving cloud cover,” Mike told Universe Today via email. “Most of the light pollution in this image is coming from Farmington, Maine which is about 35 miles from this location.”

Mike added the footage from this timelapse will be featured in his upcoming short film “Shot In The Dark.”

He also provided this info about Iridium flares:

Iridium satellites are in near-polar orbits at an altitude of 485 miles. Their orbital period is approximately 100 minutes with a velocity of 16,800 miles per hour. The uniqueness of Iridium flares is that the spacecraft emits ‘flashes’ of very bright reflected light that sweep in narrow focused paths across the surface of the Earth. An Iridium communication satellite’s Main Mission Antenna is a silver-coated Teflon antenna array that mimics near-perfect mirrors and are angled at 40-degrees away from the axis of the body of the satellites. This can provide a specular reflection of the Sun’s disk, periodically causing a dazzling glint of reflected sunlight. At the Earth’s surface, the specular reflection is probably less than 50 miles wide, so each flare can only be viewed from a fairly small area. The flare duration can last from anywhere between 5 to 20 seconds and can easily be seen by the naked eye.

If you want to try and see an Iridum flare for yourself, check out Heavens Above for your location.

For this image Mike used:
Nikon D600 & 14-24 @ 14mm
f/2.8 – 30 secs – ISO 3200 – WB Kelvin 3570
06/23/14 – 11:07PM
Processed via Lightroom 5 & Photoshop CS5

Check out more of Mike’s work at his website: Taylor Photography. He also leads workshops on night sky photography.

Want to get your astrophoto featured on Universe Today? Join our Flickr group or send us your images by email (this means you’re giving us permission to post them). Please explain what’s in the picture, when you took it, the equipment you used, etc.

About 

Nancy Atkinson is Universe Today's Senior Editor. She also is the host of the NASA Lunar Science Institute podcast and works with Astronomy Cast. Nancy is also a NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador.

Tagged as: Astrophotos, Iridium Flare, milky way

Share
  Section:  Articles - File Under:  Space  |  
 
«StartPrev12345678910NextEnd»

Page 5 of 170
FNN Home Space
English (United Kingdom)
SpaceX Aims for Mars with Reusable Rockets, Spaceships:     LOS ANGELES — As SpaceX's Dragon capsule descended toward Earth, it was clear this landing was going to be different than previous ones. Instead of falling toward the ocean...
Deluxe News Pro - Copyright 2009,2010 Monev Software LLC

ERS Broadcast Networks

ERS Broadcast Networks - Links