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Internet Television

YouTube Unveils New Features For Content Creators | Studio App, Crowdfunding, 60fps
YouTube would be nothing without content, and original content, no less. And the people who create that original content need as many tools at their disposal as possible. YouTube has delivered a new set of features to content
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Netflix & Co. will soon make more money than movie theaters 05 June 2014, 15.49 Internet Television
Netflix & Co. will soon make more money than movie theaters
Jun. 4, 2014 - 10:06 AM PDT Jun. 4, 2014 - 10:06 AM PDT Do you prefer a night in with Netflix over paying $8 for popcorn at the theater? You’re not alone: Box office revenue has been flat over the past few years while online
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ISP to Netflix: Please come to Hong Kong! 05 June 2014, 15.49 Internet Television
ISP to Netflix: Please come to Hong Kong!
Jun. 4, 2014 - 7:15 AM PDT Jun. 4, 2014 - 7:15 AM PDT Hong Kong Broadband Network (HKBN) would love to offer its customers Netflix. The local ISP decided to make its love for House of Cards and other Netflix shows public with
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Longform journalism startup Byliner is in trouble and says its future is unclear
Jun. 3, 2014 - 6:09 PM PDT Jun. 3, 2014 - 6:09 PM PDT It’s no secret that I was bullish on Byliner, the e-singles startup that launched with a splash in 2011 with bestselling author Jon Krakauer’s “Three Cups of
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Cord Cutters: My review of Tablo, a DVR for over-the-air TV 05 June 2014, 15.49 Internet Television
Cord Cutters: My review of Tablo, a DVR for over-the-air TV
1 day ago Jun. 4, 2014 - 3:26 PM PDT Tablo is a new DVR for cord cutters that comes without any HDMI port, but with the ability to stream live and recorded TV to mobile devices, Roku boxes and Chromecast sticks. Check out our
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Earth News Reports

Pop culture heroes drawn as ukiyo-e characters 28 July 2014, 20.03 Green Architecture
Pop culture heroes drawn as ukiyo-e characters
Japanese artist Takao Nagawa took on the ukiyo-e classic style by mixing it with modern pop culture heroes like Super Mario or Darth Vader, among others. He drew the heroes in the Samurai poses, changing their facial
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Living sculptures by Mike Campau 28 July 2014, 20.03 Green Architecture
Living sculptures by Mike Campau
Strange abstract structures are given life by simply adding clothing to it. It’s interesting to see how a few pieces of clothing make some weird forms come to life. This series was created by combining studio photography
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Cute or scary? Anatomical illustrations of famous cartoon characters
Parts of me want to find these illustrations extremely cute, while another part of my brain finds these bones popping out a bit disguting. Anyway, these drawings are a great take on some famous cartoon characters. It was
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Funny street art on train tracks 28 July 2014, 20.03 Green Architecture
Funny street art on train tracks
Portuguese street artist Artur Bordalo decided to get a new playground for his art: train tracks. He uses the tracks as a grid and integrates it into bigger-than-life artworks. You can check out more of his great art on his
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Visual identity for FYI Network 28 July 2014, 20.03 Green Architecture
Visual identity for FYI Network
The TV channel FYI Network recently commissionned Sasha Vinogradova to design their visual identity. The graphic designer played with the 3 letters of the brand’s name and dressed it in 3D. Prints for new shows focus on
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Spectacular illustrated posters by Ken Taylor 28 July 2014, 20.03 Green Architecture
Spectacular illustrated posters by Ken Taylor
Based in Melbourne, Ken Taylor is an illustrator and designer who made himself a name in the music industry. His work that got my attention is the illustrated posters for movies. I really wish some movies would have so cool
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4 ways to extract images from PDF files 28 July 2014, 20.03 Green Architecture
4 ways to extract images from PDF files
When you get a PDF file and need to get the images included in it, here is how to extract images from PDF easily. We’ll look at several ways to do it, with paid or free software. Extract images from PDF online If your
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10 free paint Photoshop textures packs 28 July 2014, 20.03 Green Architecture
10 free paint Photoshop textures packs
A texture is the basic fundament which a designer must know in order to build a reliable basement for the attractive design work. The core task with the texture is to find the most appropriate way to combine colors and visual
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Upgrade your gaming empire: 10 best games WordPress themes 28 July 2014, 20.03 Green Architecture
Upgrade your gaming empire: 10 best games WordPress themes
Games create a second reality. They can turn a common office worker into a daemon-slayer or car races. They can make you a hero of a story worth reading, or let you communicate in the environment that never existed on Earth.
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TRMTAB Weaves Leather Waste Into Upcycled Laptop, Tablet Sleeves
RECOMMENDED FOR YOU: PACT Unveils Fair-Trade-Certified, Organic-Cotton Clothing Line Retrend Alert TRMTAB Weaves Leather Waste Into Upcycled Laptop, Tablet Sleeves by Lori Zimmer , 07/28/14   filed under: Eco-Friendly
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Technology News Reports

SOM’s West Palm Beach Concourse is the Third Station for All Aboard Florida’s Rail Network
Share on TumblrEmail The new West Palm Beach station for the All Aboard Florida rail network will be located on a 2.5 acre site in the heart of downtown. SOM and
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Chicago Approves Plan for Urban Agriculture Eco-District to Revitalize Southside Neighborhoods
Share on TumblrEmail Chicago’s Englewood, Washington Park and Woodlawn neighborhoods were once home to a thriving street life, centered around bustling
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Maintenance-Free Priority Bicycles Make Cycling Even Easier
Share on TumblrEmail It may be difficult to imagine a bicycle that doesn’t need regular adjustments and tune-ups to keep riding smoothly, but the folks who created Priority Bicycles have created just that.
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Housetrike Bike Camper is a Tiny Shelter on Wheels That Empowers the Homeless
Share on TumblrEmail The Housetrike is essentially a bike equipped with a small front-loaded camper that slides open and serves as a warm and comfortable bed
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Atlanta’s ‘Emerald Necklace’ Beltline Was a Grad Student’s Dream in 1999 and is Now a Reality
Share on TumblrEmail Gravel always wondered about the abandoned railroad tracks he’d seen in some of the city’s older neighborhoods. Further investigation
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Tesla’s $35,000 Model III Electric Car is Coming in 2017 With a 200-Mile Range
Share on TumblrEmail Tesla’s CEO Elon Musk has revealed that the automaker’s latest sedan will be called the Model III when it goes on sale in 2017. Both cheaper and smaller than the Model S, the Tesla
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A Laboratory for Rare Cells Sheds Light on Cancer
A way of capturing cancer cells from the bloodstream opens a new front in personal cancer treatment. By Antonio Regalado on July 10, 2014 Dangerous mix: Tumor cells collected from the bloodstream of a woman with breast
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Low-Power Color Displays 15 July 2014, 20.32 Tech
Low-Power Color Displays
Oxford University researchers demonstrate that materials used in DVDs could make color displays that don’t sap power. By Kevin Bullis on July 9, 2014 Power saver: Researchers are hoping the type of phase-change material
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Beijing Wants to Understand Its Smog 15 July 2014, 20.32 Tech
Beijing Wants to Understand Its Smog
New effort would pinpoint the source, type, and dispersal patterns of smog across Beijing to drive street-level predictions and targeted remediation. By David Talbot on July 8, 2014 Smog check: Smog in Beijing has grown
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How to Clean the Gas and Oil Industries’ Most Contaminated Water
A new process can cheaply clean extremely briny water coming up from oil wells. By David Talbot on July 7, 2014 Water works: This water treatment plant in Midland, Texas, will soon treat 500,000 gallons of oilfield waste
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Travel App Can Recommend Places by Looking at Them
Software that counts dogs, martini glasses, and mustaches in Instagram photos provides a novel way to rate businesses. By Caleb Garling on July 14, 2014 Food finder: Jetpac works out good places to eat by extracting data
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Israeli Rocket Defense System Is Failing at Crucial Task, Expert Analysts Say
Although it appears to hit incoming Hamas rockets, Israel’s system could be falling short of detonating the rockets’ warheads. By David Talbot on July 10, 2014 Flawed technology: Analysts question whether Israel’s
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Fighter planes which split in two like 'Transformers' and self-healing aircraft are set to revolutionise air warfare by 2040
The Transformer aircraft is seen as massive advance in military technology as the jet divides into several parts performing different roles once reaching the objective Once completed, the jets can reform creating a
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Qualcomm to boost wireless performance to gigabit levels with Wilocity acquisition
Qualcomm announced today that it will acquire 60GHz WiFi company Wilocity and incorporate the design firm’s products into its own SoC lineup. Wilocity has demonstrated 60GHz WiFi before and previously partnered with
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Report: Comcast’s public Xfinity WiFi program actually costs you money
Last year, Comcast announced that it would begin rolling out a WiFi program that uses customer hardware to throw a wide public net. While it’s free to Comcast’s own Xfinity subscribers, everyone else is expected to pay
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Anger mounts over Facebook’s news feed experiment, company denies wrongdoing
Over the last few years, Facebook has taken an increasing interest in manipulating how its users interact with the site. It limited the reach of advertisers and groups, defaults to a “Top Stories,” rather than “Most
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This Universal Bike Can Be Adjusted to Fit Any Body 06 July 2014, 22.32 Transportation
This Universal Bike Can Be Adjusted to Fit Any Body
Share on TumblrEmail A bicycle that fits your body properly is an absolute pleasure to ride, but many people just don’t buy the bike that’s right for them. Alternately, they’ll buy one that’s right
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Will The World Cup Bring More Visibility to the Greenest City In The World?
Share on TumblrEmail Curitiba’s green initiatives originated in the 1960s with its mayor, Jaime Lerner, who famously said, “This city is not for cars,” well
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Trouble-free Funnell Backpack Ejects a Waterproof Jacket to Protect Cyclists from the Rain
Share on TumblrEmail Cycling is one of the most fun ways to get around a city, but getting drenched in an unexpected downpour can put a damper on anyone’s day. Enter Funnell, a backpack with a waterproof
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Google Capital backs Hadoop challenger MapR
In the growing world of Hadoop--the open source big data technology that can store, process and analyze large sets of data across clusters of computers--much of the conversation (and media coverage) has revolved around
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Supercooling organs buys time for transplants
A new slow-cooling technique makes it possible to transplant a donated liver that's been outside the body for four days. Right now, the limits of human organ storage are about six to 12 hours, maybe up to 24 hours in some
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Copenhagen's new bikeshare system has on-board tablets
Copenhagen is regularly near the top of lists touting the best cities for biking in the world. Now the city has a bikeshare system to match its sterling cycling reputation. High-tech doesn't often come to mind when talking
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5 Ways to Forget How Bad Transformers: Age of Extinction Is
Hasbro By now, you’ve survived the Age of Extinction and once again succumbed to the lure of those Robots in Disguise, despite the presence of Mark Wahlberg and excitable directorial presence of Michael Bay. But where do
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Vintage Pesticide Paraphernalia From the Glory Days of DDT
Cedar wallpaper impregnated with DDT. Photo: Jared Soares/WIRED Cedar wallpaper impregnated with DDT. Photo: Jared Soares/WIRED DDT-impregnated wallpaper with images of Donald Duck and Pluto (or Jack and Jill)
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Grueling 39K-Mile Yacht Race Tests the Sanity of Cramped Crews
Photo: Gilles Martin-Raget/Team Alvimedica Photo: Gilles Martin-Raget/Team Alvimedica Photo: Tim Moynihan Photo: Volvo Ocean Race Photo: Daniel Forster/Team Alvimedica Photo: Daniel Forster/Team
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See Outtakes From Some of History’s Most Iconic Photos
Magnum's contact sheet exhibition places famous photographs next to the contact sheets they were chosen from by the photographers and their editors. Photos by Steve McCurry/Magnum Photos Magnum's contact sheet
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A Mod That Adds Co-Op Capabilities to Your StarCraft Campaign
When it comes to real-time strategy games, there are usually two main gameplay modes: the single-player campaign, where you play through a series of missions and experience the game’s story, and the multiplayer, where you
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A Perfect Post-Apocalyptic Library That Offers Books and Booze
The folks at the Long Now Foundation think deep thoughts about humanity’s future—their to-do list includes building a clock that’ll keep time for 10,000 years. But in the meantime they’ve built something more practical:
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Will 60fps YouTube videos force game developers to prioritize frame rate?
This week, Google announced that 48fps and 60fps video playback will be available on YouTube sometime in the next few months. Most video is still shot at 24 or 30 frames per second, but there is a growing demand for high
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Has Google lost the plot again at I/O 2014, or is there a method in the madness?
Back in 2011, Google’s incoming CEO Larry Page promised to put “more wood behind fewer arrows.” Since then, Google has made good on the promise and proceeded to shut down a large number of products (Reader, iGoogle,
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Android ‘L’, Android smartwatches, Android Auto, and Android TV announced at Google I/O
Updated @ 2:40pm That’s it — the keynote is over. This incredibly long event took us from the Android “L” release to Android Auto to Android TV. We saw smartwatches, smart TVs, and a brand new UI on the stage. There
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US Supreme Court rules against Aereo, eviscerates the company’s business model
The Supreme Court ruled today that Aereo’s business model, which uses hundreds of tiny antennas to transmit individual streams of television to specific users, is illegal and violates the Copyright Act of 1976. Aereo’s
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How to watch hacking, and cyberwarfare between the USA and China, in real time
You’ve no doubt heard countless stories about how the internet is rife with hackers and ruled by malware-peddling malcontents. You’ve probably read dozens of paragraphs on how the next great theater of war will
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Sony pushes 4K TV at the World Cup, even though there’s nothing to watch – and no Blu-rays, cables, or bandwidth for 4K
At the 2014 World Cup, the weirdest thing isn’t that USA is doing better than England, but that 4K TV is being pushed surprisingly hard. As I watched USA versus Portugal last night, one of the main ads around the edge of
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Issue 21 27 June 2014, 16.43 Tech
Issue 21
© CBS Interactive. All rights reserved.A ZDNet Web site | Visit other CBS Interactive sites: This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service — if this is your content and you're reading it on someone else's site,
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Q&A: How the mythology of big data can blind us
Kate Crawford has an unusual talent. She demystifies big data so effectively she finds herself flown around the world to do just that. But there's a catch. Just when you think you understand how big data works, she throws a
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Google begins removing search results in Europe
In May, the European Union's highest court ruled that individuals have the "right to be forgotten," meaning that anyone in the E.U. could request that Google remove links that appear when you Google search for that person. On
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World’s First Glow-in-the-Dark Road Promises a Brighter, More Energy-Efficient Future
Share on TumblrEmail Recently, prolific Dutch designer Daan Roosegaarde and civil engineering firm Heijmans nabbed headlines by installing the world’s first glow-in-the-dark road in the
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SkyTran to Build Futuristic Maglev ‘Hover Monorail’ in Israel
Share on TumblrEmail SkyTran Inc. and Israel Aerospace Industries just signed an agreement to build a high-speed, levitating, energy-efficient transportation system at the Israel Aerospace Industry (IAI)
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Aquarius USV: Eco Marine Power Unveils Solar-Electric Hybrid Vessel for the High Seas
[WizardRSS: unable to retrieve full-text content]Eco Marine Power (EMP) is dedicated to developing energy-efficient marine vessels, and they just unveiled their latest ship design - the Aquarius Unmanned Surface Vessel (USV).
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Malware on the Move 27 June 2014, 16.43 Tech
Malware on the Move
Already a Magazine subscriber? You're automatically an Insider. It's easy to activate or upgrade your account. Activate Your Account Become an Insider It's the new way to subscribe. Get even more of the tech news, research,
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The Importance of Feelings 27 June 2014, 16.43 Tech
The Importance of Feelings
For decades, biologists spurned emotion and feeling as uninteresting. But Antonio Damasio demonstrated that they were central to the life-regulating processes of almost all living creatures. Damasio’s essential insight is
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Searching for the "Free Will" Neuron 27 June 2014, 16.43 Tech
Searching for the "Free Will" Neuron
It was an expedition seeking something never caught before: a single human neuron lighting up to create an urge, albeit for the minor task of moving an index finger, before the subject was even aware of feeling anything.
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The Cross-Section of Memory 27 June 2014, 16.43 Tech
The Cross-Section of Memory
Neuroscientists at MIT’s Picower Institute have demonstrated that optogenetics can be used to place false memories in the brains of lab rodents. By Sam Wotipka, Emma Sconyers, and Lindsay Brownell on June 17,
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Weed’s Chronic Energy Use Becomes a Concern
Researchers are discovering ways to grow marijuana more efficiently. By Kevin Bullis on June 27, 2014 The legalization of marijuana in some U.S. states has energy providers worrying that a boom in indoor growing could put
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The Thought Experiment 27 June 2014, 16.43 Tech
The Thought Experiment
I was about 15 minutes late for my first phone call with Jan Scheuermann. When I tried to apologize for keeping her waiting, she stopped me. “I wasn’t just sitting around waiting for you, you know,” she said, before
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Tech Time Warp of the Week: 50 Years Ago, IBM Unleashed the Room-Sized iPhone
That massive computer in the latest season of Mad Men is the real thing. The machine that takes up a whole room in the fictional 1960s ad agency at the heart of the critically acclaimed TV series—and leads ad man Michael
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Angular Size of a Soccer Goal 27 June 2014, 16.43 Tech
Angular Size of a Soccer Goal
When I watch the World Cup, I always think about set pieces. This is when the ball is placed at a certain spot and a team is allowed to then kick the ball (called a free direct kick). If this kick occurs near the goal, the
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Outlander TV Adaptation Won’t Shy Away From Spanking
Elenna Loughlin Diana Gabaldon is the author of the wildly popular Outlander series, which tells the story of Claire Randall, a World War II-era nurse who finds herself transported to 18th-century Scotland, where she falls
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Gadget Lab Podcast: Android All Over 27 June 2014, 16.43 Tech
Gadget Lab Podcast: Android All Over
So Googly Ariel Zambelich/WIRED Lots of big announcements from Google this week. During the keynote speech of its I/O developer conference, the company laid out its broad, forward-looking plan for the future of the Android
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U.S. Says It Spied on 89,000 Targets Last Year, But the Number Is Deceptive
Getty About 89,000 foreigners or organizations were targeted for spying under a U.S. surveillance order last year, according to a new transparency report. The report was released for the first time Friday by the Office of
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Apple Kills Aperture, Says New ‘Photos’ App Will Replace It
Apple introduces OS X Yosemite at WWDC 2014. Photo: Apple Heavy-duty photo-editing Mac users may not be happy this morning. Apple told news website The Loop that it has decided to abandon Aperture, its professional
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Hacker hijacks thousands of Synology storage devices, forces them to mine 500 million Dogecoins
If you have a device that connects to the internet on a regular basis, patch it. That’s the big-picture takeaway from today’s news of a hacker who convinced Synology DiskStations (a type of network-attached storage
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What is 802.11ax WiFi, and do you really need a 10Gbps connection to your laptop?
If you thought that your new 802.11ac router’s max speed of 1,300Mbps was pretty crazy, think again: With 802.11ac fully certified and out the door, the Wi-Fi Alliance has started looking at its successor, 802.11ax —
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Creative Cloud and Photoshop 2014: Adobe piles on the goodies for photographers
Adobe is continuing its full-court press to convince photographers to move to its Creative Cloud subscription-based licensing model. Today’s announcement of Creative Cloud 2014 marks its biggest effort yet. New features in
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Adobe Ink stylus and Slide ruler aim to replace your sketch pad with an iPad (video)
Adobe has long dominated the business of providing software tools for creative professionals — but it has always shied away from hardware. Today that changes with the roll-out of two new accessories designed to play into
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Europe and South Korea unite to standardize 5G, even though true 4G still isn’t available
Europe, perhaps a little bit embarrassed about being so far behind the US’s deployment of 4G LTE, has announced that it will work together with South Korea to develop the next-gen 5G standard. Both the EU and South Korea
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T-Mobile Un-carrier 5 and 6: Free iPhone loans, VoLTE, and unmetered music
On Tuesday evening, T-Mobile held its Un-carrier event in Seattle and streamed it live to the public. To everyone’s surprise, T-Mobile launched two initiatives: free 7-day test drives with the iPhone 5S, and unmetered music
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How to beam energy to wireless, batteryless pacemakers
Engineers have found a safe way to wirelessly transfer energy to medical implants in the body. They used it to power a tiny batteryless pacemaker that's about the size of a grain of rice. And so far it works! In rabbits for
Read More 59 Hits 0 Ratings
Your next flight could be revolutionizing weather forecasting
Twice a day the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) releases weather balloons at 102 sites throughout the United States, Caribbean, and Pacific. The data these balloons collect help meteorologists
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Harley-Davidson Unveils Its Very First Electric Motorcycle
Share on TumblrEmail Electric vehicles are known for being whisper quiet, but that wouldn’t be right with a Harley-Davidson chopper. In place of gas explosions
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Cannondale’s Chainless CERV Concept Bike Transforms as You Ride It!
Share on TumblrEmail Priority Designs and Cannondale have joined forces to create a cutting-edge concept bike that transforms to change shape as you ride it! Known as the Continuously Ergonomic Race Vehicle
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A Flying Car that Takes You Sightseeing: Is This the Future of Transportation?
Share on TumblrEmail Created by design team Akki Reddy Challa, Fabien Chancel, and Michael Harboun, The Aeon Project takes on the challenge of melding
Read More 353 Hits 0 Ratings
Shining Light on Madness 21 June 2014, 18.59 Tech
Shining Light on Madness
At Novartis’s research lab in Cambridge, Massachusetts, a large incubator-like piece of equipment is helping give birth to a new era of psychiatric drug discovery. Inside it, bathed in soft light, lab plates hold living
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Cracking the Brain’s Codes 21 June 2014, 18.59 Tech
Cracking the Brain’s Codes
In What Is Life? (1944), one of the fundamental questions the physicist Erwin Schrödinger posed was whether there was some sort of “hereditary code-script” embedded in chromosomes. A decade later, Crick and Watson
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A Search Engine for the Era of Apps 21 June 2014, 18.59 Tech
A Search Engine for the Era of Apps
A new kind of search engine will make it possible to search inside the apps on your phone. By Tom Simonite on June 15, 2014 Once upon a time there was the Web, a vast universe of information and services that were tangled
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Eavesdropping on Neurons 21 June 2014, 18.59 Tech
Eavesdropping on Neurons
A new automated version of one of neuroscience’s most important techniques, patch clamping, makes it much easier and faster for scientists to tap into the inner workings of brain cells. By Alix Morris, Jenny Rood, and Abi
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Neuroscience’s New Toolbox 21 June 2014, 18.59 Tech
Neuroscience’s New Toolbox
The hypothalamus is a small structure deep in the brain that, among other functions, coördinates sensory inputs—the appearance of a rival, for example—with instinctual behavioral responses. Back in the 1920s, Walter
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The Promise and Perils of Manipulating Memory
When it comes to the study of memory, we might be living in something of a golden age. Researchers are exploring provocative questions about what memory fundamentally is—and how it might be manipulated. Some scientists are
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A Laboratory for Rare Cells Sheds Light on Cancer PDF Print E-mail

A way of capturing cancer cells from the bloodstream opens a new front in personal cancer treatment.

Tumor cells

Dangerous mix: Tumor cells collected from the bloodstream of a woman with breast cancer are seen growing in the lab.

In 1869, the Australian physician Thomas Ashworth put the blood of woman who had died of breast cancer under a microscope. Peering through it, he spotted “cells identical with those of the cancer itself.”

He postulated that the large and abnormal cells in her blood might explain metastases all over her body, more than 30 of them. The cancer cells were probably moving through the circulatory system, creating the rash of tumors.

In a new report published in Science, researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital say that after capturing these “circulating tumor cells” from patients fighting cancer, they have been able to keep them growing in the lab, and tested drugs against them.

The work is a “critically important proof of concept study” that shows how researchers might one day undertake personalized studies on patients’ own tumor cells, says Stefanie Jeffrey, a cancer expert at Stanford University. 

The circulating tumor cells are extremely rare—they account for one of every billion cells found in a patient’s blood. Yet the researchers were able to pluck tumor cells from the blood of six patients with advanced breast cancer and then culture them, or keep them alive and multiplying. While scientists at Baylor University first showed last year that culturing tumor cells from the blood was possible, the Boston scientists also managed to place the cells into micro-vessels—each holding about 200 cells—and test whether they could be killed with one or more drug treatments.

Daniel Haber, the Mass. General oncologist who led the study, says the approach could eventually help resolve common situations he faces in his clinic, when patients stop responding to an initial treatment. Which drug to give them next is often little better than a guess. “You need to know what you are treating,” says Haber.

Over the last decade, a huge amount of effort has gone into engineering devices able to capture cancer cells in the blood, including technologies like “nano Velcro,” magnetic sifters, and simple paper filters. The Mass. General device, called the CTC-iChip, was created over the last three years in the lab of engineer Mehmet Toner and is considered one of the most advanced (see “Device Finds Stray Cancer Cells in Patients’ Blood”).

At Toner’s lab, vials of blood set into the instrument rock back and forth, dripping fluid through a series of microchannels that remove normal blood cells. After about half an hour, all that’s left is a plastic bag filled with a small number of the rare cancer cells. Development of the device has been paid for by Johnson & Johnson, which has spent $30 million funding the work.

Johnson and Johnson already sells a system called Cellsearch that can count tumor cells in the blood. But that device, approved by the FDA in 2004, has not proved so useful to doctors. The number of tumor cells in someone’s blood predicts their chance of surviving, but it doesn’t help doctors know how to treat the patient.

Some doctors aren’t sure that personalized testing of tumor cells will help either. One problem is that it’s very difficult, and took the Mass General team months of effort to grow cells from the patients. That’s too long to be helpful in picking a treatment; some patients don’t survive that long. “It’s expensive and it takes several months. I don’t think this is going to have a future for patient care,” says Massimo Cristofanilli, an oncology specialist at Jefferson University Hospital, in Philadelphia.

Stanford’s Jeffrey adds that it’s still unclear whether cancer cells in the blood are really the same as those in a person’s tumors. That means it’s uncertain if tumors and the cells will respond in the same way to drug treatments. 

Instead, the technology may prove more important in studying how metastases occur. As Ashworth hypothesized in the 19th century, cancer cells must spread through the bloodstream. Yet very little is known about what makes a cell metastatic and able to escape into the blood and take hold elsewhere.

“These are very rare cells that circulate for a very short time and disappear,” says Haber. Yet they “may be responsible for the vast majority of cancer deaths. This is a technology that lets you look at something you could never see before.” 

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Low-Power Color Displays PDF Print E-mail

Oxford University researchers demonstrate that materials used in DVDs could make color displays that don’t sap power.

example of an electrically constructed image on a phase change material optoelectronic film

Power saver: Researchers are hoping the type of phase-change material shown here could lead to ultra-low-power displays.

Researchers at Oxford University have used a type of phase-change material to make devices whose color changes instantly in response to a small jolt of power.  The materials, which are used in some types of DVDs, could lead to ultra-low-power full-color displays, according to an article describing the work in the journal Nature.

Displays made using the approach might overcome some of the drawbacks of other low-energy display technologies, such as the E-ink used in Kindle e-readers. For example, pixels can switch on and off much faster than in the e-reader, which could make it useful for displaying video.

Researchers have long known that shining a laser on phase-change materials can change their crystal structure. This, in turn, changes the way light bends when it encounters them—that’s how information is stored in rewriteable DVDs.

The Oxford researchers showed that similar optical changes can be achieved by applying a small jolt of power. They also showed that when these materials are sandwiched between two very thin layers of transparent conductive material, changes in the way light bends can also produce changes in color. Light reflects off each of the layers in different ways, canceling some wavelengths and amplifying others—green and blue light might be eliminated, leaving red, for example. Varying the thickness of the layers, or the voltage applied to the phase-change material, affects what colors each pixel in a display shows.

On display: This image was electrically constructed on optoelectronic film made from a phase-change material.

Unlike conventional displays, which require a constant supply of power to produce a glowing pixel, these devices maintain their color without any electricity. It’s the same energy-conserving strategy used in the e-ink displays in Kindle e-readers.

The researchers haven’t made a complete display yet. Instead, they used the ultra-sharp tip of an atomic force microscope to sketch out images by applying electricity to specific parts of the phase-change material. But in theory, the color changes could be controlled using some of the same electronics used in other types of displays.

The technology will face competition from OLED displays, which use less power than conventional LCD displays yet produce sharp, high-contrast color images. The Oxford researchers say they need to improve the contrast of their images to be competitive.

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Beijing Wants to Understand Its Smog PDF Print E-mail

New effort would pinpoint the source, type, and dispersal patterns of smog across Beijing to drive street-level predictions and targeted remediation.

Smog in Beijing

Smog check: Smog in Beijing has grown far worse in the past two decades, thanks to coal-fired industries, power plants, and surging automobile use.

In a new tactic in Beijing’s growing battle on choking smog, sensors and analytics will pinpoint the source and trajectory of polluting particles and forecast levels three days in advance down to the resolution of individual streets.

IBM, which is working with Beijing officials, says its cognitive computing systems will “analyze and learn from streams of real-time data” from air-monitoring stations and satellites. IBM hopes to have built an analytics platform by early next year based on the inputs of existing sensors in the Chinese capital. After that, IBM will install additional sensors and develop analytics programs at the direction of the Beijing government. 

The Beijing government has said that it will spend $160 billion to reduce the density of so-called PM2.5—fine smog particles that are 2.5 micrometers or smaller in diameter—by 25 percent by 2017. The particles come from a variety of sources, including coal burning and industrial and vehicle emissions.

The problem is so bad that the Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences recently said that Beijing is “almost unfavorable for human living.” Beijing’s 2013 PM2.5 concentrations averaged 89.5 micrograms per cubic meter last year, and surged above 600 on the worst days this past January. The World Health Organization says levels must remain below 25 to be safe.

Tao Wang, resident scholar at the Carnegie-Tsinghua Center for Global Policy, a Beijing-based think-tank, says better data will help. “They know roughly the sources, but not the proportion from the different sources, or the interaction between pollutants,” Wang said. “The capability to monitor is lacking and they need to improve that. A lot of what this is about is getting this down to a lot more micro areas of the city, and getting more discrete measurements.”

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How to Clean the Gas and Oil Industries’ Most Contaminated Water PDF Print E-mail

A new process can cheaply clean extremely briny water coming up from oil wells.

water treatment plant in Midland, Texas

Water works: This water treatment plant in Midland, Texas, will soon treat 500,000 gallons of oilfield waste water daily.

In a nondescript site in Midland, Texas, an inexpensive new process is cleaning up some of the most contaminated water around—the extremely salty stuff that comes up with oil at wells. By the end of next month the technology is expected to be chugging 500,000 gallons per day, furnishing water that’s sufficiently clean to use in hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, for oil and natural gas production (see “Natural Gas Changes the Energy Map”).

The technology may provide a way to deal with the increasing amounts of contaminated water the fossil fuel industry is generating as it pursues more and more difficult-to-reach deposits. Many oil formations can produce as much as five barrels of contaminated water for every one barrel of oil. And the volume of this so-called “produced” water is rising as the industry pumps water into nearly depleted wells to enhance oil recovery.

In the Midland plant, the technology is proving more economical than the existing strategy: re-injecting the wastewater back into the wells, while purchasing clean water for use in nearby fracking operations. Right now, gas producers tend to store water that comes back up during the process in man-made ponds and dilute it for reuse. Ultimately they inject the dirty water deep underground for final disposal.

“This is far and away the largest such plant anyone has ever built. Past prototypes have done 200 gallons a day; this is vastly larger, modular, and scalable; if they wanted to double it, they could,” says John Lienhard, a professor of mechanical engineering at MIT who heads MIT’s Center for Clean Water and Clean Energy, where the technology was developed.

The new plant uses technology from Gradiant, an MIT spinout company based in Woburn, MA. The water is pretreated to remove oil and grease residue and solid particles. The company heats the saline water and sprays it into a porous material with a large surface area, saturating air with water vapor.

This water-saturated air is then pumped up through tiny holes in a series of shallow, water-filled trays. As bubbles pass through the water in the trays, the water vapor in the bubbles condenses and joins the water it is passing through, creating more fresh water. This so-called “bubble column” allows the company to condense water vapor without needing expensive metal heat exchangers.

The process—which the company calls carrier gas extraction—recycles up to 85 percent of the heat needed to keep the system running. The remaining waste is then disposed as sludge in landfills. The project is being done with Pioneer Natural Resources, an oil company in Texas.

Anurag Bajpayee, president and CEO of Gradiant who co-developed the technology with the company’s CTO, Prakash Govindan, says the initial focus is on the booming petroleum and natural gas industry in the United States and elsewhere. “Water issues have been a point of a lot of controversy for the industry,” he says. 

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Travel App Can Recommend Places by Looking at Them PDF Print E-mail

Software that counts dogs, martini glasses, and mustaches in Instagram photos provides a novel way to rate businesses.

Food finder: Jetpac works out good places to eat by extracting data from photos shared on Instagram.

A travel app called Jetpac hopes to tackle two of the most pressing questions of our time: how can machines reliably extract information from images, and what exactly is the definition of a hipster?

Jetpac provides a consumer guide to local restaurants, bars, and coffee shops. But unlike competitors such as Yelp, it doesn’t rely on customers writing up reviews. Instead the company uses software to process public Instagram photos tagged with the business’s name and measures things like the number of smiles in the picture or amount of blue sky. Jetpac uses that information to help people searching for a tranquil coffee shop with outdoor seating or suitable venue for a social gathering.

“It’s like you stuck your head in the bar,” says Jetpac CTO Pete Warden. “Photos have a lot of signals in them.” Those include whether a bar is dog-friendly (which can be determined by counting pooches per picture) or high-class (by looking for clues such as martini glasses rather than beer cans).

Jetpac’s image analysis can also reveal things about specific Instagram users that guide its recommendations. Gastronomes tend to snap Instagram pictures of their groceries, so restaurants they frequent are likely to be foodie favorites. If the majority of an Instagram user’s photos are in Seattle and suddenly a few smiling pictures appear in Boston, Jetpac takes it as a signal that person is visiting a good tourist spot.

Jetpac does turn to humans to help its software with more qualitative measures, though. To inform the app’s “hipster finder,” which tries to point people to the coolest places in a city, Warden and his team used the crowdsourcing service Mechanical Turk. People were asked to label photos with key markers, like mustaches, plaid clothing, or chunky glasses, providing baseline data that allowed software to look for similar patterns in future photos to peg establishments with high hipster attendance.

Warden’s company uses software based on deep learning, an approach to training software loosely modeled on the brain and pioneered at Google (see “10 Breakthrough Technologies 2013: Deep Learning”). Jetpac’s algorithms are based largely on the research of deep learning expert and current Google employee Geoff Hinton (Google declined to make him available for this story). Jetpac has made the code for some of its deep learning software freely available, and released an iPhone app that can be trained to recognize objects using a device’s camera.

However, even using deep learning, images remain difficult for software to understand. Software can be very accurate at identifying a smile when there is a single face in a photo, says James Shanahan, vice president of data science for ad platform NativeX. But such systems fare less well with more complex images. “With three or more people, things get difficult,” Shanahan says.

Altogether, software can’t yet reliably understand everything in a single image, says Andrew Ng, chief scientist at Baidu, who previously worked on deep learning at Google. “It’s a difficult computer vision problem to look at a picture and determine the ‘mood’ of the scene,” he says.

Jetpac also has to work against the fact that Instagram images are often blurry, under- or overexposed, distorted by the service’s signature filters, and represent a carefully curated slice of reality. Social network enthusiasts tend to only share the good times. “Instagram is a lot more intentional,” Warden says. The younger demographic of Instagram users also means that more expensive restaurants are underrepresented in Jetpac’s data. And pictures with smiles are not necessarily indicative of the quality of a bar or restaurant, given that many people tend to smile for a camera anywhere after a few drinks. Warden notes the number of pictures with smiles spikes on Friday and Saturday evenings.

However, Warden says that combining results from multiple photos makes it possible to glean accurate enough information. Yelp reviews tend to focus on the mechanics of an establishment like service and food quality, says Warden, but looking at images allows Jetpac to get a sense of the experience of being there. “We’re not trying to do a scientific survey, but the more data we get, the better the picture we’re likely to get of what the place is actually like.”

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Israeli Rocket Defense System Is Failing at Crucial Task, Expert Analysts Say PDF Print E-mail

Although it appears to hit incoming Hamas rockets, Israel’s system could be falling short of detonating the rockets’ warheads.

Iron Dome air defense system

Flawed technology: Analysts question whether Israel’s Iron Dome air defense system, seen here firing to intercept a rocket headed for Tel Aviv, is achieving its aims.

Even though Israel’s U.S.-funded “Iron Dome” rocket-defense interceptors appear to be hitting Hamas rockets in recent days, they are almost certainly failing in the crucial job of detonating those rockets’ shrapnel-packed explosive warheads, expert analysts say.

As a result, rockets fired from Gaza are probably plunging to the ground with intact explosives. The fact that they aren’t causing injuries or deaths in Tel Aviv, Jerusalem, and other cities is mainly a matter of luck, the analysts add.

On Thursday, the Israel Defense Forces said missiles from the system had intercepted 56 rockets fired out of Gaza, preventing strikes in several cities. Yet Richard Lloyd, a weapons expert and consultant who is a past Engineering Fellow at Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems, says that because these interceptions had almost certainly not detonated the rockets’ warheads, the system is essentially failing.

The Iron Dome system—meant to hit rockets traveling tens of miles from launch to landing—is a smaller cousin to the Patriot system, which attempts to hit much longer-range, faster incoming missiles. Iron Dome fires interceptors six inches wide and 10 feet long and uses sensors and real-time guidance systems to try to zero in on the rockets.

When an Iron Dome interceptor gets close to an incoming rocket, a proximity fuse triggers the interceptor to detonate, spraying out metal rods that are intended to strike and detonate the warheads on the incoming rockets, neutralizing their ability to maim people and destroy things on the ground.

Ted Postol, the MIT physicist and missile-defense expert who aided Lloyd’s analysis and who in 1991 debunked claims by the U.S. Army that its Patriot missiles were successfully shooting down Iraqi Scud missiles during the first Gulf War (see “Postol vs. the Pentagon” and “Preventing Fratricide”), agrees that Iron Dome’s interceptors have not been succeeding at this crucial warhead-detonation job. (See “An Explanation of the Evidence of Weaknesses in the Iron Dome Defense System”).

Postol had been an admirer of Iron Dome after initial reports of its performance during previous rocket assaults in 2012 (see “Why Israel’s Iron Dome Missile Defense System Actually Works”). But later analyses of interceptor contrails showed that its guidance system was behaving erratically. Instead of smoothly rising to meet their targets, the interceptors were making sharp turns and engaging from the side or behind, he says.

Those problems appear to be continuing, he says. “We expected that after more than a year and a half of time, whatever problems there were in the system related to guidance and control would be mitigated, or somewhat mitigated,” he says. “As it turns out, this is not the case. As far as we can tell, it is behaving in the same erratic way as it did in November 2012.”

The Iron Dome interceptors need to hit an incoming rocket head-on to have much hope of detonating a warhead, Lloyd says. And initial visual analysis of the engagements in recent days shows that the interceptions that are occurring are from the side or behind, which provide “essentially a zero chance of destroying the warhead,” based on the basic physics of such engagements, he adds.

Efforts to reach the Israel Defense Forces for comment were unsuccessful.


This story was updated on July 11 to note that the Israeli military could not be reached for comment.

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Google Capital backs Hadoop challenger MapR PDF Print E-mail

In the growing world of Hadoop--the open source big data technology that can store, process and analyze large sets of data across clusters of computers--much of the conversation (and media coverage) has revolved around companies Cloudera and Hortonworks.

Now another player is positioning itself to challenge them. MapR Technologies announced this morning it has raised $110 million in an equity and debt financing round led by Google Capital. Qualcommon Ventures and existing investors Lightspeed Venture Partners, Mayfield Fund, NEA and Redpoint Ventures also participated in the equity round. Silicon Valley Bank is providing $30 million in debt financing.

Hadoop is one of the more popular spots within Big Data for investors to plant their money because its framework, which is hosted by the non-profit Apache Foundation, is considered one of the most effective tools for taking mountains of Big Data and converting them into compact files that existing applications can digest. Hadoop, named after the creator's son's toy elephant, is being used by the telecommunications, manufacturing, retail and healthcare industries--to name a few.

With Hadoop, data that was once too expensive to store can be made available for analysis at one-tenth to one-fiftieth the cost on a per terabyte basis, according to MapR. The idea behind Hadoop is to help companies struggling with big data to simplify the process so they can more easily find insights in all that data and, ultimately, use it to improve their business.

For example, MapR's distribution for Hadoop allows Beats Music to analyze a high volume of data from its users and then make music recommendations personalized to them. HP uses MapR as a massive storage platform to integrate and analyze data from multiple sources.

In terms of capital investment, MapR still trails Hortonworks and Cloudera, which have raised a total of $225 million and $300 million, respectively. However, the company does have a strong base of high-profile customers, including Cisco, Samsung, Beats Music, comScore, Ancestry.com and HP.

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Supercooling organs buys time for transplants PDF Print E-mail

supercooledliver02-top.jpg

A new slow-cooling technique makes it possible to transplant a donated liver that's been outside the body for four days. Right now, the limits of human organ storage are about six to 12 hours, maybe up to 24 hours in some cases.

Not only would supercooling keep organs from spoiling, it would also widen the geographic range of donor organs intercontinentally. So far, the preservation technique has at least tripled the storage time of viable rat livers for transplanting into other rats. Because the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has already approved most of the method's chemical components for use in humans, Nature reports, clinical trials could begin just two years after it's tested in larger animals.

Developed by Harvard's Korkut Uygun and colleagues, the approach combines subzero, non-freezing -- or supercooled -- tissue preservation with extracorporeal machine perfusion, which delivers oxygen and nutrients to the tiny blood vessels in tissue while they're outside the body.

Here's how it works, according to a National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering press release. First, the liver is perfused with a solution in the pump system pictured to the right below. The blue color is caused by the "cryoprotectant" chemicals that act together as antifreeze that surrounds the components of the system and prevents ice from forming. This temperature regulating solution contains:

  • A nontoxic, modified sugar compound called 3-OMG (3-O-methyl-D-glucose). Because 3-OMG can't be metabolized, it accumulates in the liver cells and acts as a protectant against the cold.
  • Secondly, PEG-35kD (polyethylene glycol) protects cell membranes in particular. The active ingredient in antifreeze is ethylene glycol, and it works by lowering the freezing point of the solution, keeping it liquid even at subzero temps.

After this first round of perfusion, the livers are slowly cooled below freezing point to minus 6 degrees Celsius (21 degrees Fahrenheit), but without inducing freezing -- this supercools the organs for preservation. After storing the organs like this for a few days, the livers are perfused with the solution in the pump system again, to rewarm the organ and prepare it for transplantation.

supercooledliver01-cropped.jpgThe team tested the technique in 18 healthy rates. They demonstrated 100 percent survival rates a month after the rats received transplants of livers preserved for three days using this method. About 60 percent of the rats who received livers preserved for four days survived beyond a month. Pictured above, a supercooled rat liver sits in the preservation solution in the machine perfusion system.

In contrast, no livers were viable for three days using conventional methods that combine cold temps with chemical solutions developed in the 1980s. More than 120,000 patients are still on waitlists for organ transplants in the U.S. alone, and 17,000 of them are waiting for livers. The new technique could rescue organs that are marginally damaged (and usually discarded), creating thousands more donor options, New Scientist reports. It would also buy time to prepare organ recipients.

Uygun tells Nature that with a bit of tweaking, the method should scale up to larger organs, including human ones, and wouldn't be limited to livers. "All organs are fair game," he adds.

The work was published in Nature Medicine yesterday.

[NIH via Nature, New Scientist]

Images: Wally Reeves, Korkut Uygun, Martin Yarmush, Harvard University

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Copenhagen's new bikeshare system has on-board tablets PDF Print E-mail

copenhagen-bikeshare-bycyklen-facebook.jpg

Copenhagen is regularly near the top of lists touting the best cities for biking in the world. Now the city has a bikeshare system to match its sterling cycling reputation.

High-tech doesn't often come to mind when talking about bikes or bikeshare, but Bycyklen, the name of Copenhagen's new bikeshare system, is rolling out a fleet of innovative bikes.

As with most bikesharing system, users pick up bikes at docking stations and drop them off at stations throughout the city. Commuters in the city can get on a subscription plan to pay for their rides and reduce the per hour price. Tourist can rent bikes by the hour. But what sets the system apart are the bikes.

Each bike is equipped with an electric motor (which the city claims to be carbon neutral) and a "vandal-proof" tablet installed in the center of the handlebar that can be used as a GPS or travel guide with tips for what to do in the city. Gobike created Bycyklen's smart bikes.

[embedded content]

The system has been criticized, however, for its high costs and safety concerns from distracted riding. So why did Copenhagen go with smart bikes to replace its old bikeshare? As Andreas Røhl, head of the Mobility and Urban Space unit of the Copenhagen municipality, told Quartz, it's because the city needed a bike that stands out since it already has high rate of bike ownership.

It would be a waste of tax-payer money to simply give them more bikes. (That is also why the first half-hour is not free, as is common practice in other cities.) Instead, the city determined that GoBikes should be attractive to people who may not be used to cycling--such as tourists and suburbanites.

The system also saves money by providing financial incentives for users to park bikes at less-busy stations so that less money is spent to distribute bikes from full stations to empty stations, according to Quartz.

The question is whether the smart bikeshare model will be a novelty in Copenhagen or if cities where traditional bikes are a novelty will consider using smart bikes for bikeshare.

Photo: Bycyklen/Facebook

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Computer News Reports

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BlackBerry has a digital assistant, too 15 July 2014, 20.32 Computers
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Apple agrees to pay up to $400 million in e-books price-fixing case
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Microsoft's Nadella preaches productivity to partners
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Intel will make chips for Panasonic's audiovisual systems
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IDC: Apps will drive public cloud spending to sustained double-digit growth
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US open to discussion about German accused of being a double agent
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Judge makes Avaya give access to maintenance commands on some PBXes
Avaya must give its customers access to maintenance software for some enterprise phone switches so they can service the systems themselves or hire a third party to work on them, a federal judge has ruled. The June 30
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How to use your Android tablet as a second laptop screen
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Google adds 13 more languages to Gmail 06 July 2014, 22.30 Computers
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California removes ban on Bitcoin, Dogecoin, and other alternative currencies
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Europe cuts roaming charges, plans to eliminate them by end of next year
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Flash storage faces challenge from Crossbar's RRAM
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What you missed at CE Week 29 June 2014, 15.19 Computers
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Android Wear smartwatches: Specs, prices and launch dates for all known models
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The tablet’s tortured past: 8 failures that led to the slates we use today
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MonkeyParking says SF shut-down demand is bananas
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Google talks about the Android L design and all the work that goes into making it great
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8 ways the password is dying 27 June 2014, 16.43 Computers
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Google Ordered To Remove ‘Innocence Of Muslims’ Over Actress’ Copyright Claims
An appeals court has ordered Google to remove a controversial short film from YouTube after an actress who appeared in Innocence Of Muslims filed a copyright claim. The decision seems to go against existing thinking on
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LoveFilm Becomes Amazon Prime Instant Video In The UK, With £79 Adding A Raft Of Extras
LoveFilm is no more, being rebranded as Amazon Prime Instant Video and being folded into the existing Amazon Prime service. Most people will have to pay more money for the service, but the £79-per-year asking price buys you
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Netflix News Roundup: Subscriber Numbers, Pricing Tiers, Net Neutrality Statement
Netflix has had a big news week, with various stories emerging from and about the streaming video company. This includes revenue and subscriber numbers, plans for new pricing tiers and an expansion into Europe, and a statement
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What The Net Neutrality Ruling Means For Online Video 18 January 2014, 22.47 4G Voice, Video, & Data
What The Net Neutrality Ruling Means For Online Video
A recent decision by an appeals court in Washington to chuck out net neutrality rules could have dire consequences for everyone using the Internet. Including those who both deliver and consume online video. Net Neutrality
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Vdio Is Dead | Rdio Shutters Video Service 28 December 2013, 22.35 4G Voice, Video, & Data
Vdio Is Dead | Rdio Shutters Video Service
Vdio is no more, with parent company Rdio deciding to shutter the online video service. The reasons for the closure remain unclear, but it seems that there just wasn’t room for Vdio in an already-crowded market. It didn’t
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YouTube’s Content ID Crackdown On Let’s Play Videos Draws Ire From Gamers & Developers
YouTube’s recent crackdown on Let’s Play videos, with an aggressive new Content ID update, has left a bad taste in the mouths of everyone involved. Except the companies making money from videos they really had no business
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Google Fights Back After YouTube Comments Spam Increased | Google+ Integration Staying
Google has finally addressed the issues affecting the new YouTube comments system, controversially rolled out earlier this month. Unfortunately, while small changes are being made to plaster over the cracks, the elephant in
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YouTube Changes Comments System To Google+, Even Jawed Karim Complains 10 November 2013, 00.35 4G Voice, Video, & Data
YouTube Changes Comments System To Google+, Even Jawed Karim Complains
Google has rolled out the new YouTube comments system, which is designed to stop the absurd levels of spam and trolling which have plagued the site in recent years. Unfortunately the new system requires Google+ integration,
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File contained a virus and was deleted 02 November 2013, 22.56 4G Voice, Video, & Data
File contained a virus and was deleted
I had a client that was recently getting this message.  If you are getting it, the cause can be a misconfiguration or worse. The result can sometimes be caused by faulty anti virus programs.  Or anti virus programs that were
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YouTube Launching Paid Spotify-Like Streaming Music Service Before End Of 2013
Google is set to launch a YouTube music streaming service before the end of 2013, at least if current persistent rumors are to be believed. This service will work the same way as Spotify, with a hefty catalog of music
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Is Online Streaming Availability To Blame For Movie Piracy? Research Suggests It Could Be
Do people pirate things because they’re cheap and want to get whatever they can for free? Or is the practice less sinister and more about getting hold of things that aren’t available in the format they favor? These are
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Netflix Originals Keeping Subscribers Happy | Original Content Strategy Already Working
Original content looks like being a small but significant part of the future of online television.. It’s certainly an area Netflix, amongst others, has explored, and one which, according to a new report, looks to be working
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YouTube Founders Unveil MixBit, A Vine & Instagram Competitor With Hidden Tricks
The mobile video space is becoming more crowded by the day. Following on from Vine and its six seconds of recording simplicity, and Instagram and its 15 seconds of recording simplicity, comes MixBit. Can this new startup
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YouTube Opening New Production Studio In New York | Original Content Ramped Up
YouTube is set to continue its efforts to evolve from the home of a disparate collection of funny animal videos into the home of truly talented individuals all creating professional-quality programming. In order to affect this
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Google Launches Chromecast, a $35 Dongle That Streams Content From Mobile To TV
Google recently unveiled Chromecast, a $35 dongle that is able to stream content from mobile devices to your television. This is Google’s latest attempt to grab a foothold in the TV industry, which it’s going to need to be
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Hulu Owners Decide Not To Sell After All | Fox, NBC, & Disney Reinvest Millions Instead
Hulu has been withdrawn from sale for the second time in its history, with the joint partners once again deciding against accepting the bids that were coming in, just as they did in 2011. Instead, the three partners are
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Video on Instagram Arrives To Compete With Vine | Facebook & Twitter Go Head-To-Head
Facebook and Twitter have been at war as competing social networks for a number of years. But the latest battleground between the two is mobile video, with Video on Instagram (owned by Facebook) arriving as a direct response
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PalmPad: HP Slate in Palm Clothing? 17 June 2013, 15.02 4G Voice, Video, & Data
PalmPad: HP Slate in Palm Clothing?
Dec. 21, 2010 - 12:39 PM PDT Dec. 21, 2010 - 12:39 PM PDT Summary: It’s being reporting today that HP/Palm is preparing to release the “PalmPad” next month. The story is accompanied by a diagram showing the PalmPad.
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Home Health Monitoring is Big Business 17 June 2013, 15.02 4G Voice, Video, & Data
Home Health Monitoring is Big Business
Dec. 21, 2010 - 7:55 AM PDT Dec. 21, 2010 - 7:55 AM PDTSummary: Remote health monitoring generated €7.6 billion globally in 2010, an amount destined to grow as this nascent area of healthcare is used more heavily in the
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Last Minute Geek’s Holiday Gift Guide 17 June 2013, 15.02 4G Voice, Video, & Data
Last Minute Geek’s Holiday Gift Guide
Dec. 20, 2010 - 11:36 AM PDT Dec. 20, 2010 - 11:36 AM PDT The geek in your life is hard enough to find appropriate gifts for the holidays, and this year, once again you waited until the last moment. Never fear, we have scoured
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Android This Week: Leveling Off; Fring Calling; LogMeIn 17 June 2013, 15.02 4G Voice, Video, & Data
Android This Week: Leveling Off; Fring Calling; LogMeIn
Dec. 18, 2010 - 6:00 AM PDT Dec. 18, 2010 - 6:00 AM PDTSummary: The growth of Android in the smartphone space has been phenomenal, but recent ad statistics show it may be leveling off. VoIP calling is hot on Android, however,
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MobileTechRoundup 226 17 June 2013, 15.02 4G Voice, Video, & Data
MobileTechRoundup 226
Dec. 17, 2010 - 8:00 AM PDT Dec. 17, 2010 - 8:00 AM PDT Summary: Join James, Matt and Kevin live for this week’s audio podcast where they’ll cover the week’s mobile technology news and share experiences with the
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Kindle for Android Gets Periodicals, In-App Store 17 June 2013, 15.02 4G Voice, Video, & Data
Kindle for Android Gets Periodicals, In-App Store
Dec. 17, 2010 - 7:08 AM PDT Dec. 17, 2010 - 7:08 AM PDTSummary: Amazon has rolled out a major new version of the Kindle app for Android that adds magazines and newspapers to the standard e-book fare. The app also adds shopping
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Samsung ATIV Smart PC 17 June 2013, 15.02 4G Voice, Video, & Data
Samsung ATIV Smart PC
The tablet market is going into hyperdrive.  The announcement of Microsoft’s foray into the tablet market utilization with Windows 8 architecture made a few ripples.  It will be really interesting to see how this plays
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Norton Hotspot VPN 17 June 2013, 15.02 4G Voice, Video, & Data
Norton Hotspot VPN
One of the thorniest issues is traveling and maintaining security.  Norton has come up with a nice little VPN package that allows for secure surfing while on open networks. If you have ever been in a hotel, most likely you
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Briefly unavailable for scheduled maintenance WordPress Error 17 June 2013, 15.02 4G Voice, Video, & Data
Briefly unavailable for scheduled maintenance WordPress Error
WordPress is awesome until it isn’t.  Knowing you (or not really knowing you – but knowing how most people operate), you probably did the automatic update with no backup. Yep, it’s what most people do.  You
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Tactus Amazing Tactile Mobile Buttons 17 June 2013, 15.02 4G Voice, Video, & Data
Tactus Amazing Tactile Mobile Buttons
Touch screens rule the day, but maybe not forever – if Tactus has anything to say about it.  They say the flat, touch screens are boring and they are looking to put some caliente into em. The idea is really simple. 
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Has LinkedIn Been Hacked? 17 June 2013, 15.02 4G Voice, Video, & Data
Has LinkedIn Been Hacked?
Well, that is the million dollar question, isn’t it?  I have seen a lot of accusation and rumor going around, but I have yet to see any substantiating evidence. In fact, updating twitters from LinkedIn are saying that
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Thoughts On Arrested Development Season 4 & How Netflix Is Changing The Future Of TV
As you’ve no doubt heard by now, Arrested Development is back, with Season 4 made exclusively for Netflix. The whole season is now available for subscribers to stream, and it’s well worth watching. Take my word for it. But
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Tesla's sales model? It's simple: don't sell cars: If you are waiting with bated breath for electric vehicles to revolutionize the transportation sector, you are likely to pass out. If it happens, it will not be an overnight process. That...
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