ScienceWatch.TV

JBookmarks

Add to: JBookmarks Add to: Facebook Add to: Webnews Add to: Buzka Add to: Windows Live Add to: Icio Add to: Ximmy Add to: Oneview Add to: Kledy.de Social Bookmarking Add to:  FAV!T Social Bookmarking Add to: Favoriten.de Add to: Seekxl Add to: BoniTrust Add to: Power-Oldie Add to: Bookmarks.cc Add to: Newskick Add to: Newsider Add to: Linksilo Add to: Readster Add to: Yigg Add to: Linkarena Add to: Digg Add to: Del.icoi.us Add to: Reddit Add to: Jumptags Add to: Upchuckr Add to: Simpy Add to: StumbleUpon Add to: Slashdot Add to: Netscape Add to: Furl Add to: Yahoo Add to: Blogmarks Add to: Diigo Add to: Technorati Add to: Newsvine Add to: Blinkbits Add to: Ma.Gnolia Add to: Smarking Add to: Netvouz Add to: Folkd Add to: Spurl Add to: Google Add to: Blinklist Information

Science News Reports

Physicists continue to investigate why the universe did not collapse
This is the "South Pillar" region of the star-forming region called the Carina Nebula. Like cracking open a watermelon and finding its seeds, the infrared telescope "busted
Read More 100 Hits 0 Ratings
Giant enhancement of magnetic effect will benefit spintronics
(Top) perpendicular and (bottom) parallel magnetic anisotropy. Credit: Yang, et al. ©2015 American Chemical Society (Phys.org)—Researchers have demonstrated that coating
Read More 86 Hits 0 Ratings
Study shows important goal for organic semiconductors is attainable
Under UV light, DPA crystals produce strong blue emission with particularly bright edge emission. Credit: Liu, et al. CC-BY-4.0 (Phys.org)—In organic semiconductor
Read More 92 Hits 0 Ratings
Building the US big data machine 29 December 2015, 23.09 Science
Building the US big data machine
The US National Science Foundation (NSF) just put $5 million (€4.68 million) into big data research, establishing four regional centers to advance innovation and spur collaboration across
Read More 72 Hits 0 Ratings
Dark matter: Seeing the unseen with supercomputers 29 December 2015, 23.09 Science
Dark matter: Seeing the unseen with supercomputers
Way back in the 1930s, scientists observed evidence of an unseen force moving galaxies at a speed different than expected, dubbing it 'dark matter.' In 2015, scientists at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory used the
Read More 72 Hits 0 Ratings
Warning: Pacific Rim researchers are about to outpace you
A happy product of an international collaboration between the Asia Pacific Advanced Network (APAN) and the US National Science Foundation (NSF), the TransPAC Pacific Wave 100G will be able to keep up with the large data
Read More 67 Hits 0 Ratings
Standing on NASA’s shoulders 29 December 2015, 23.09 Science
Standing on NASA’s shoulders
Read More 66 Hits 0 Ratings
Mobile phone data helps predict dengue advance 29 December 2015, 23.09 Science
Mobile phone data helps predict dengue advance
Researchers in Pakistan have shown that mobile phone data can be used to better understand how dengue fever
Read More 57 Hits 0 Ratings
Time traveling with El Niño 29 December 2015, 23.09 Science
Time traveling with El Niño
Every two to seven years, the eastern tropical Pacific warms in an event known as El Niño. When meteorologists began comparing this year with the last major event in 1997, NCAR scientists performed side-by-side
Read More 63 Hits 0 Ratings
CARDIOPROOF – a ‘proof-of-concept’ for model-based cardiovascular prediction
CARDIOPROOF aims to ascertain the applicability and effectiveness of predictive modelling and simulation tools for cardiology, validating them in interrelated clinical trials conducted in three European centers of excellence in
Read More 74 Hits 0 Ratings
Avoiding unconscious bias to enable diversity 29 December 2015, 23.09 Science
Avoiding unconscious bias to enable diversity
When Florence Hudson, a 30 year tech veteran who has worked with Grumman, NASA, and IBM, is still being talked down to, you know we've got a problem with gender expectations. Internet2 has launched a Gender Diversity Initiative
Read More 69 Hits 0 Ratings
Sifting big mobile phone data predicts your next move
Like a scene out of an Orwell novel, an international team of researchers has mined millions of call detail records and can now predict your next move with a high degree of accuracy. Not to worry — your next move is not that
Read More 65 Hits 0 Ratings
What if there was a little cat who was afraid of mice?
A new European project is exploring computational creativity. It is working to engineer software that can take on some of the creative responsibility in arts and science
Read More 71 Hits 0 Ratings
Gut feeling: XSEDE and TACC explore vascular disease
Tens of thousands suffer from abdominal aortic aneurysms every year, too often with deadly consequences. Yale scientists looked to Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) supercomputers to model the flow
Read More 72 Hits 0 Ratings
Research networks in Uganda on the upswing 29 December 2015, 23.09 Science
Research networks in Uganda on the upswing
Leaving the dark ages of the bandwidth consortium in the past, the Research and Education Network of Uganda (RENU) is leading Ugandan networks into an age of enlightenment. Despite difficult terrain, low funding, and remote
Read More 69 Hits 0 Ratings
Celebrating 10 years of the UbuntuNet Alliance 29 December 2015, 23.09 Science
Celebrating 10 years of the UbuntuNet Alliance
The UbuntuNet Alliance is the research and education networking organization for eastern and southern Africa. November will mark 10 years since the alliance was formed at the World Summit on the Information Society in Tunis,
Read More 72 Hits 0 Ratings
Open data, open research, open scholarship 29 December 2015, 23.09 Science
Open data, open research, open scholarship
Open scholarship is important for an open society and has the power to improve lives across the globe. However, achieving this vision may require the redesign, enhancement, or adaptation of the e-infrastructures used for
Read More 67 Hits 0 Ratings
Hold an elephant in the palm of your hand 29 December 2015, 23.09 Science
Hold an elephant in the palm of your hand
Scientific artist Jonty Hurwitz creates the world's smallest sculptures. His latest work of art highlights the fragile state of the African elephant. Can art and science save the elephant from
Read More 74 Hits 0 Ratings
The future of encryption 29 December 2015, 23.09 Science
The future of encryption
As our reliance on digital technology grows, increasing numbers of us look to cloud storage to access personal data. But who's keeping our data secure? The US National Science Foundation (NSF) is funding groundbreaking
Read More 73 Hits 0 Ratings
12 amazing fossil finds of 2015 29 December 2015, 23.09 Science
12 amazing fossil finds of 2015
From a spongelike speck to a bird built to terrify, 2015’s fossil finds added details, drama — and some real characters — to the story of life on Earth. These specimens flesh out life’s timeline too, spanning
Read More 67 Hits 0 Ratings
As suicide rates rise, researchers separate thoughts from actions
Craig Bryan treats military personnel who struggle with thoughts of ending their own lives, as well as those who’ve survived an actual suicide attempt. But these days he’s fighting an uphill battle. Suicide rates in the
Read More 58 Hits 0 Ratings
Astronomical milestones of 2015 29 December 2015, 23.09 Science
Astronomical milestones of 2015
The New Horizons mission to Pluto might get all the attention, but 2015 had plenty of other amazing space mission firsts — and lasts, as scientists said good-bye to two orbiters. Dawn The Dawn probe arrived at Ceres March
Read More 70 Hits 0 Ratings
Multi-scale modeling in the virtual laboratory 06 August 2015, 23.46 Science
Multi-scale modeling in the virtual laboratory
From the flow of air past an airplane’s wing down to the movement of electrons around individual atoms, supercomputers can be used to simulate materials at diverse scales. Different scales provide different levels of
Read More 332 Hits 0 Ratings
XSEDE humanities gateways 06 August 2015, 23.46 Science
XSEDE humanities gateways
Humanities gateways are the newest arrow in the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) quiver. With friendly interfaces, these gateways make it easy for humanities researchers to stay on target and
Read More 349 Hits 0 Ratings
Supercomputers stomp grapes to improve US wine 06 August 2015, 23.46 Science
Supercomputers stomp grapes to improve US wine
Researchers at Virginia Tech have modeled and mapped grape production across an area spanning 19 states along the eastern US. Supercomputers helped crunch the numbers and stomp the grapes in an effort to speed wine
Read More 303 Hits 0 Ratings
Fuel-free nanomotor is powered by ultrasound and magnetic fields
The magneto-acoustic hybrid nanomotor has dual propulsion modes: an acoustic field (ultrasound) operates on the nanomotor’s gold nanorod segment, while a magnetic field operates on the
Read More 438 Hits 0 Ratings
Physicists observe magnetic 'devil's staircase'
Devil’s staircase behavior emerges in the magnetic structure of a cobalt oxide material. Three magnetic phases are shown here, where the arrows represent the different spin configurations that
Read More 391 Hits 0 Ratings
Simple hydrogen storage solution is powered by solar energy
The new reversible hydrogen storage method stores hydrogen atoms in cyclohexane and uses solar energy to release the hydrogen atoms, turning the cyclohexane molecule into benzene. The use of solar
Read More 380 Hits 0 Ratings
Seabirds may navigate by scent 03 July 2015, 19.36 Science
Seabirds may navigate by scent
Seabirds called shearwaters manage to navigate across long stretches of open water to islands where the birds breed. It’s not been clear how the birds do this, but there have been some clues. When scientists magnetically
Read More 373 Hits 0 Ratings
Why seahorses have square tails 03 July 2015, 19.36 Science
Why seahorses have square tails
Hammering and squishing 3-D printed seahorse tail segments reveals what’s so great about being square. Angled bones hitched together in a flexible string of squares create protective cages that are four times stronger than
Read More 366 Hits 0 Ratings
Wrinkled brain mimics crumpled paper 03 July 2015, 19.36 Science
Wrinkled brain mimics crumpled paper
Cramming a big brain into a skull may be as easy as just wadding it up. The same physical rules that dictate how a paper ball crumples also describe how brains get their wrinkles, scientists suggest July 3 in Science. That
Read More 419 Hits 0 Ratings
Bird photo ID: Birders team with artificial intelligence to solve mystery
The Merlin smartphone app has the solution to your bird watching mysteries. Now, Merlin Bird Photo ID takes it one step farther, identifying birds from uploaded photos. Crowd sourcing and artificial intelligence come together
Read More 412 Hits 0 Ratings
Working towards a European open science cloud 03 July 2015, 19.36 Science
Working towards a European open science cloud
Last week, CERN hosted an event to discuss ongoing efforts to develop a ‘European open science cloud’. The aim of this work is to bring public research organizations and e‐infrastructures together with
Read More 263 Hits 0 Ratings
HPC for your visual library: How algorithms and supercomputers assess video quality
The volume of video content has exploded in recent years, and museums and libraries face the daunting task of evaluating the condition of their collections to make preservation and access decisions. To meet this challenge,
Read More 237 Hits 0 Ratings
AI points to better decision-making despite poker match loss
Carnegie Mellon University computer scientists looked to Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center supercomputer Blacklight in their construction of Claudico, a poker-playing artificial intelligence. Claudico came up short against the
Read More 371 Hits 0 Ratings
Caught and caged: the future of drug delivery
Discover how the DNANANO project has been using the Curie supercomputer — a PRACE tier-0 system — to help design nanocages for targeted drug delivery. Simulating one of these nanocages for just 100
Read More 340 Hits 0 Ratings
How the NIH facilitates biomedical research: A conversation with George Komatsoulis
At the recent Internet2 Global Summit iSGTW sat down with George Komatsoulis to talk about the state of distributed research and the NIH Commons, a scalable virtual environment to provide high-performance computing and data
Read More 326 Hits 0 Ratings
Semiliquid battery competitive with both Li-ion batteries and supercapacitors
The new battery (pink star), in comparison with other energy-storage devices, exhibits a very high power density and a reasonably good energy density. Credit: Ding, et al. ©2015 American Chemical
Read More 292 Hits 0 Ratings
New device may make converting waste heat to electricity industrially competitive
The proposed thermoelectric device consists of many parallel nanowires with an external gate voltage that can be tuned to optimize the efficiency and power output for different temperature
Read More 276 Hits 0 Ratings
Physicists find ways to increase antihydrogen production
Antihydrogen consists of an antiproton and a positron. Credit: public domain (Phys.org)—There are many experiments that physicists would like to perform on antimatter, from studying its
Read More 272 Hits 0 Ratings
NASA picks nine instruments for future mission to Europa
 Your daily roundup of research news Science News Staff Science Ticker Planetary Science 4:54pm, May 26, 2015 A future mission to Europa, illustrated here, will investigate the moon’s subsurface ocean while
Read More 239 Hits 0 Ratings
White House hits pause on editing human germline cells
 Your daily roundup of research news Science News Staff Science Ticker 4:05pm, May 26, 2015 Clinical experiments that use DNA-editing methods to alter human germline cells have been put on hold in the United
Read More 214 Hits 0 Ratings
Diet and nutrition is more complex than a simple sugar
A new study shows that the simple sugar fructose has different effects on human behavior than glucose. But it’s doesn’t tell us much about what those lollipops will do to our health or behavior. When it comes to studying
Read More 276 Hits 0 Ratings
Acting Out Dreams Is Often Early Sign of Parkinson's Disease
Credit: Sergey Nivens/Shutterstock.com A rare sleep disorder that makes people act out their dreams may be an early warning of a deadly neurological illness, a new review of previous research suggests. About half of
Read More 452 Hits 0 Ratings
Playing with Fire: AI Makers Must Be Careful 13 April 2015, 23.29 Science
Playing with Fire: AI Makers Must Be Careful
Credit: jimmi | Shutterstock From smartphone apps like Siri to features like facial recognition of photos, artificial intelligence (AI) is becoming a part of everyday life. But humanity should take more care in
Read More 392 Hits 0 Ratings
Man Tears Tendon After Playing 'Candy Crush' for Weeks
Credit: Authentic Creations / Shutterstock.com A California man tore a tendon in his thumb after playing a puzzle game on his smartphone too much, according to a new report of the case. The case is interesting because
Read More 500 Hits 0 Ratings
Marijuana Extract May Help Reduce Epilepsy Seizures
Credit: Atomazul | Shutterstock.com A medicine made from marijuana may provide some relief to people with severe epilepsy who don't get better after trying other treatments, according to a new study. In the study,
Read More 360 Hits 0 Ratings
How to Avoid a Shark Attack 13 April 2015, 23.29 Science
How to Avoid a Shark Attack
A great white shark. Credit: Sergey Uryadnikov/Shutterstock.com The seventh fatal shark attack in four years struck this past weekend at a surfer's paradise in the Indian Ocean. Yet teaching people when and where to swim
Read More 1258 Hits 1 Rating
Dog Family: Facts About Canines & Their Cousins
A pack of grey wolves in Slovenia. Credit: Miha Krofel, Slovenia Dogs and humans have been best friends for thousands of years. Researchers know that dogs regularly lived with humans by about 10,000 years ago, and dogs
Read More 1344 Hits 1 Rating
Physicists propose method to measure variations in the speed of light
A relation between the angular diameter distance (DA), the Hubble function (H), and the speed of light c at a specific point called the maximum redshift (zM) may allow researchers to detect
Read More 309 Hits 0 Ratings
Maze-solving automatons can repair broken circuits (w/ video)
This screenshot from the video below shows the self-healing of an open circuit fault. When a fault occurs, an electric field develops in the gap, which polarizes the conductive particles in the
Read More 280 Hits 0 Ratings
Unparticles may provide a new path to superconductivity
Unparticles may emerge when, at high energies, the particle sector couples to the unparticle sector. Physicists plan to look for the signatures of unparticles in future experiments, possibly by
Read More 256 Hits 0 Ratings
Focus on disability: Reaching patients with smartphones
Hannah Kuper, co-director of the International Centre for Evidence in Disability at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in the UK, explains how cheap smartphone adapters can be used to diagnose ear and eye
Read More 360 Hits 0 Ratings
Drawn to the sound: Supercomputers reveal phonon magnetism
Using the Oakley supercomputer and a very small, frozen tuning fork, Joseph Heremans is rewriting our science textbooks. His computational research team has discovered that phonons — sound and heat particles —
Read More 262 Hits 0 Ratings
Tiny GEMs, big insights 13 April 2015, 23.27 Science
Tiny GEMs, big insights
Read More 272 Hits 0 Ratings
Citizen scientists earn their stripes with tiger-tagging app
Researchers from the University of Surrey, UK, have developed an iPad app that could change the way wildlife is monitored in the future. The Wildsense app loads photos of tigers from the web for analysis by players in return
Read More 241 Hits 0 Ratings
Afterglow alerts astronomers to gamma-ray burst
STARBURST  These images from the Samuel Oschin telescope show the sudden appearance of a bright flash (middle frame, in crosshairs) that gradually faded (right). All three photos were taken within several hours on Feb. 26,
Read More 254 Hits 0 Ratings
Marijuana component fights epilepsy 13 April 2015, 23.27 Science
Marijuana component fights epilepsy
GREEN OPTION  A no-buzz component of marijuana can reduce severe epileptic seizures, a study suggests. A buzz-free component of marijuana can benefit epilepsy patients who have particularly severe seizures, a new study
Read More 263 Hits 0 Ratings
Rubidium atoms used to record coldest temperature — ever
CLUMPED AND COLD  Stanford University physicists used images like this one, which depicts the concentration of rubidium atoms, to determine that they had cooled the atoms to a record-low temperature. T. Kovachy et
Read More 325 Hits 0 Ratings
Rosetta data deluge reveals dynamic comet with sand dunes and jets
Last November the European Space Agency's Rosetta mission made history when its Philae lander touched down on the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko. Now, mission researchers have studied new data from a host of
Read More 306 Hits 0 Ratings
Structured photons slow down in a vacuum 24 January 2015, 00.26 Science
Structured photons slow down in a vacuum
The speed of light in a vacuum is 299,792,458 m s–1, right? Not necessarily, according to a team of physicists in the UK, which has found that the speed of an individual photon decreases by a tiny amount if it is
Read More 304 Hits 0 Ratings
Cellular model of tissue growth could shed light on metastasis
A simple yet potentially very useful model of how living cells interact to create tissue has been created by Anatolij Gelimson and Ramin Golestanian of the University of Oxford in the UK. The simulation considers how
Read More 329 Hits 0 Ratings
Magnetic levitation spins up waxy 'tektites' in the lab
Solid wax models of "splash-form tektites" – tiny pieces of natural glass that are created when asteroids or comets impact the Earth – have been created in the lab for the first time by researchers in the UK. Using
Read More 327 Hits 0 Ratings
Women shun fields that are perceived to require 'innate ability'
The notion that natural ability or brilliance are required to excel in certain fields could explain the lack of women in those subjects, according to a survey of US academics. The survey, carried out by researchers also in
Read More 271 Hits 0 Ratings
Lost Beagle 2 spacecraft found intact on Martian surface
The UK-led Beagle 2 Mars lander, thought lost on the red planet since 2003, has been found partially deployed on the Martian surface. New images show that it successfully touched down on the planet's surface in 2003 but
Read More 303 Hits 0 Ratings
Water-soluble silicon leads to dissolvable electronics
(Phys.org)—Researchers working in a materials science lab are literally watching their work disappear before their eyes—but intentionally so. They're developing water-soluble integrated circuits that dissolve in water
Read More 339 Hits 0 Ratings

Earth News Reports

Top 7 WTF Fashion, Beauty Stories of 2015 (Vote for the Most Deplorable)
From toxic fire retardants in popular nail polishes to the brutal treatment of alligators that are skinned to make Hermès Birkin bags, here are seven stories that eroded our faith in humanity. Above, three years after a
Read More 412 Hits 0 Ratings
Green Transportation | Inhabitat - Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green Building
Welcome to Inhabitat, your online guide to the best green design ideas, innovations and inspiration to build a cleaner, brighter, and better future. Get the free Inhabitat Newsletter
Read More 460 Hits 0 Ratings
Top 7 Bizarre Eco-Fashion Stories of 2015 (Vote for the Weirdest)
Leave a Comment Please keep your comments relevant to this blog entry. Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Please note that gratuitous links to your site are viewed as spam and
Read More 399 Hits 0 Ratings
Top 7 Recycled Fashion Designs of 2015 (Vote for the Most Creative!)
No failures of the imagination here. From sneakers made from recycled ocean plastic to salvaged "Sheltersuits" that convert from weather-resistant jackets into sleeping bags for the homeless, here are seven closed-loop designs
Read More 446 Hits 0 Ratings
The best of the Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 29 December 2015, 23.09 Green Architecture
The best of the Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards
Grand prizes for photography always give us the chance to discover spectacular, touching, or beautiful photos. Too often, the photos are a bit too serious, making us hope for something a bit lighter to handle. The Comedy
Read More 387 Hits 0 Ratings
Qwerkywriter: a tablet keyboard that looks like a mechanical one 29 December 2015, 23.09 Green Architecture
Qwerkywriter: a tablet keyboard that looks like a mechanical one
There is a reason why vintage products are so popular nowadays, there is some physical relation with it that can’t compare to the experience we have with electronic products. Qwerkywriter perfectly catches on this trend
Read More 463 Hits 0 Ratings
Top Web Design Trends to Watch for 2016 29 December 2015, 23.09 Green Architecture
Top Web Design Trends to Watch for 2016
That’s right, folks, we’ve followed an amazing set of design trends through 2015, and now we’re selecting our pick to watch for 2016. And just as in graphic design and fashion, there are usually some
Read More 441 Hits 0 Ratings
Phoreus Cherokee, a typeface to modernize the Cherokee language 29 December 2015, 23.09 Green Architecture
Phoreus Cherokee, a typeface to modernize the Cherokee language
With only 10’000 people still speaking the Cherokee language, it is becoming urgent for them to save one of the few remains of what was once a great nation. There are no magic methods to save a language, but a graphic
Read More 367 Hits 0 Ratings
These Victorian-era Christmas cards were dark and funny 29 December 2015, 23.09 Green Architecture
These Victorian-era Christmas cards were dark and funny
When you think of the Victorian era, you probably get serious images popping in your head. There is a good reason for that, photos from that period of time required that people stood still to get a clear image. If you do a
Read More 382 Hits 0 Ratings
A 3D printed shoe made from collected ocean plastic waste 29 December 2015, 23.09 Green Architecture
A 3D printed shoe made from collected ocean plastic waste
The fact that you don’t see ocean plastic waste on a daily basis doesn’t make it less of a terrifying problem for the future of the planet’s ecosystem. If you are not convinced, just do yourself a little
Read More 408 Hits 0 Ratings

Horoscope by Question Kit

 

Future News Reports

Obama's War Against US Energy Independence:  Give Away Oil Rich Alaskan Islands to Russia!
  By Joe Miller The Obama administration, despite the nation’s economic woes, effectively killed the job-producing Keystone Pipeline last month. The Arab Spring is turning the oil production of Libya and other Arab
Read More 3371 Hits 0 Ratings
OSBIT Power's MaXccess system completes successful offshore trials 08 April 2012, 02.33 Administrator Energy
OSBIT Power's MaXccess system completes successful offshore trials
OSBIT Power's MaXccess system completes successful offshore trials Visit http://www.osbitpower.com for further information OSBIT Power (OP), Siemens Wind Power and Statoil have successfully completed offshore
Read More 3156 Hits 0 Ratings
North America's EV charging infrastructure to get a boost 12 January 2012, 02.01 Administrator Energy
North America's EV charging infrastructure to get a boost
        North America’s EV charging infrastructure may soon see significant improvements, thanks to a recent agreement between Eaton Corporation and Coulomb Technologies. Under the deal, Eaton’s Level II and
Read More 3074 Hits 0 Ratings
Could The Gravitomagnetic Field Be The Ultimate Energy Source? 28 May 2011, 01.34 Administrator Energy
Could The Gravitomagnetic Field Be The Ultimate Energy Source?
      Have scientists already unknowingly discovered the source for all atomic energy reactions, and could the discovery of the gravitomagnetic field be the ultimate energy source?  What if our understandings on how
Read More 7508 Hits 1 Rating
Physicists urge caution over apparent speed of light violation 25 September 2011, 16.27 Administrator Energy
Physicists urge caution over apparent speed of light violation
Physicists wary of junking light speed limit yet Physicist Antonio Ereditato poses before presenting the result of an experiment, which found a subatomic particle, the neutrino, seemed to move faster than the speed of
Read More 4290 Hits 1 Rating
STEORN ORBO  FREE ENERGY:  What's Next a Self Charging Unit for your Electric Car?
Steorn's Free Energy Orbo -- From Permanent Magnets to Solid State Systems   My associate, Hank Mills composed this for PESN, Saturday, February 12, 2011 6:17 Steorn is a small company based in Dublin, Ireland. For
Read More 6138 Hits 1 Rating
Cold Fusion, Releases Energy from Hydrogen's Gravitomagnetic Field 16 January 2011, 09.17 Administrator Energy
Cold Fusion, Releases Energy  from Hydrogen's Gravitomagnetic Field
Cold Fusion "In Bologna we did it" By Ilaria VENTURI, La Republica News, Bolona, Italy For the first time in Italy, in front of experts, the process was carried out using nickel and hydrogen. It 's the way to achieve
Read More 4603 Hits 0 Ratings
Abu Dhabi Media Zone to generate renewable energy through its façade
Eco Factor: Sustainable development to generate renewable solar energy. Bernard Tschumi Architects have re-imagined their master plan for the new Abu Dhabi Media Zone, by incorporating several environmentally-friendly
Read More 3409 Hits 1 Rating

FUTURE NEWS NETWORK


Change The World!


Latest Published Articles

Science

Share


Physicists continue to investigate why the universe did not collapse PDF Print E-mail

This is the "South Pillar" region of the star-forming region called the Carina Nebula. Like cracking open a watermelon and finding its seeds, the infrared telescope "busted open" this murky cloud to reveal star embryos tucked inside finger-like pillars of thick dust. Credit: NASA

(Phys.org)—According to the best current physics models, the universe should have collapsed shortly after inflation—the period that lasted for a fraction of a second immediately after the Big Bang.

The problem lies in part with Higgs bosons, which were produced during and which explain why other particles have the masses that they do. Previous research has shown that, in the early , the Higgs field may have acquired large enough fluctuations to overcome an energy barrier that caused the universe to transition from its standard vacuum state to a negative energy vacuum state, which would have caused the universe to quickly collapse in on itself.

In a new paper published in Physical Review Letters, Matti Herranen at the University of Copenhagen and coauthors may have come a step closer to solving the problem by constraining the strength of the coupling between the Higgs field and gravity, which is the last unknown parameter of the .

As the physicists explain, the stronger the Higgs field is coupled to gravity, the larger are the fluctuations that may eventually trigger a fatal transition to the negative energy vacuum state.

In the new paper, the scientists calculated that a collapse after inflation would have happened only if the had been above a value of 1.

Combining this result with the lower bound of 0.1, which the same physicists derived last year by analyzing the requirements for stability during (rather than after) inflation, and the range of 0.1-1 constrains the coupling to near its historically estimated value of 1/6. This value of 1/6 is traditionally used as an estimate because it corresponds to zero Higgs-gravity coupling, though it is likely incorrect.

Narrowing down the Higgs-gravity coupling strength will guide physicists when analyzing experimental data to help pinpoint the coupling value with greater precision. Data on the cosmic microwave background radiation and gravitational waves, for example, are expected to help further constrain the value. When combined with other parameters, the Higgs-gravity coupling strength should produce a picture of a universe that did not transition to a state of collapse.

"It's a combination of parameters that actually determines the occurrence of such a transition, including the Higgs coupling to gravity, but also the energy scale of the inflation, which are not tightly constrained by current measurements," Herranen told Phys.org. "So, presently it is not possible to draw a conclusion on whether the standard model is in trouble due to instability-related issues, but it would be very interesting if the Higgs-gravity coupling and the scale of inflation could be constrained more tightly in the future by independent measurements, for example by observing resulting from inflation."

Taken together, the results should help scientists modify inflation models in order to describe a universe more like the one we live in.

Explore further: New study furthers Einstein's 'theory of everything'

More information: M. Herranen, et al. "Spacetime Curvature and Higgs Stability after Inflation." Physical Review Letters. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.241301

© 2015 Phys.org



Powered By WizardRSS.com | Full Text RSS Feed
Share
  Section:  Articles - File Under:  Science  |  
 
Giant enhancement of magnetic effect will benefit spintronics PDF Print E-mail

(Top) perpendicular and (bottom) parallel magnetic anisotropy. Credit: Yang, et al. ©2015 American Chemical Society

(Phys.org)—Researchers have demonstrated that coating a cobalt film in graphene doubles the film's perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA), so that it reaches a value 20 times higher than that of traditional metallic cobalt/platinum multilayers that are being researched for this property. In a material with a high PMA, the magnetization is oriented perpendicular to the interface of the material's layers. High-PMA materials are being researched for their applications in next-generation spintronic devices, such as high-density memories and heat-tolerant logic gates.
The researchers, Hongxin Yang, et al., have published a paper on the giant PMA enhancement in a recent issue of Nano Letters.

In general, work by using magnetic and electric fields to switch electron spins between their two states, which allows the spins to be used as binary information carriers. One of the goals in this area is to reduce the size of spintronic devices while achieivng long-term information retention of 10-plus years. In order to do this, the storage material must have a large PMA.

"Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) at ferromagnetic transition-metal/insulator interfaces has become of huge interest in the context of development of various spintronic devices," coauthor Mairbek Chshiev, a theoretical physicist and professor at Joseph Fourier University in Grenoble, France, told Phys.org. "Enhancement of effective PMA could be achieved either by increasing the surface PMA or by minimizing the saturation magnetization of the storage layer. The co-graphene heterostructures presented in the manuscript benefits from both these properties."

As the researchers explain in their paper, the PMA enhancement in the graphene-coated cobalt films originates at the atomic level, where graphene affects the energy of cobalt's different electron orbitals. The graphene coating changes how these orbitals overlap with one another, which in turn changes the direction of the cobalt film's overall magnetic field: some of the magnetization that was originally parallel to the film surface is now oriented perpendicular to the film surface.

The graphene-coated cobalt has another advantage, which is that the film can be made significantly thicker than other high-PMA materials. Typically, high-PMA materials can only be five or so layers thick before their perpendicular magnetism spontaneously starts to reorient itself in the parallel direction. The researchers here demonstrated that graphene-coated cobalt can maintain its perpendicular orientation even at 13 layers thick, which is another benefit for applications.

"To further optimize the downsize scalability of spintronic devices, the effective PMA of the storage layer has to be maximized so that the thermal stability factor remains high enough to achieve a long-term retention in gigabit applications," Chshiev said.

The researchers hope that these results, which demonstrate the large PMA enhancement provided by the graphene coating, will make graphene-cobalt structures promising candidates for future spintronic devices. They plant to continue investigating other high-PMA materials in the future.

"We will explore other material combinations with low spin-orbit coupling yet high PMA values for traditional and graphene spintronic devices in vertical geometry, including magnetic tunnel junctions," Chshiev said. "Spin orbitronics phenomena in lateral graphene-based devices will also be explored."

Explore further: Magnetic materials: Forging ahead with a back-to-basics approach

More information: Hongxin Yang, et al. "Anatomy and Giant Enhancement of the Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy of Cobalt−Graphene Heterostructures." Nano Letters. DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.5b03392

© 2015 Phys.org



Powered By WizardRSS.com | Full Text RSS Feed
Share
  Section:  Articles - File Under:  Science  |  
 
Study shows important goal for organic semiconductors is attainable PDF Print E-mail

Under UV light, DPA crystals produce strong blue emission with particularly bright edge emission. Credit: Liu, et al. CC-BY-4.0

(Phys.org)—In organic semiconductor materials, there has always been a tradeoff between the ability to emit light and the ability to conduct a charge, as measured by the charge carrier mobility. Now for the first time, scientists from China and the UK have designed and synthesized a new type of organic semiconductor that combines both high luminescence and high mobility in a single material.

The researchers, Jie Liu, et al, have published a paper on the new organic semiconductor in a recent issue of Nature Communications.

"The invention of an organic semiconductor with high mobility and strong emission opens the doors to the design and synthesis of [additional] novel organic semiconductors," coauthor Huanli Dong at the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Beihang University, both in Beijing, told Phys.org.

Currently, all organic semiconductor materials with high luminescence exhibit low mobility, and vice versa. Combining both traits in a single organic semiconductor has been an important goal because the combination is essential for developing new types of optoelectronics devices, such as organic light-emitting transistors (OLETs) and their offshoots, including OLET-based displays and organic electrical pumping lasers based on OLETs.

The reason why high mobility and high luminescence don't mix is because they generally require opposite types of molecular structures. High mobility requires that molecules pack together densely, but densely packed molecules cause "fluorescence quenching." Fluorescence occurs when an electron falls to its ground state, emitting a photon in the process. However, densely packed molecules tend to have strong intermolecular interactions that prevent electrons from transitioning to their ground states, which prevents photon emission.

When designing their new organic semiconducting compound, called 2,6-diphenylanthracene (DPA), the researchers kept the molecules closely packed to ensure a high mobility. But by making the molecules pack together in a strategic way, the researchers could also greatly reduce the fluorescence quenching.

(Left) Molecular structure of DPA. (Right) Under UV light, DPA powder produces strong blue emission. Credit: Liu, et al. CC-BY-4.0

The researchers describe the new molecular arrangement as "herringbone packing," a zig-zag pattern that has weaker intermolecular interactions than other types of arrangements, even though the are still very close together. The weaker interactions allow electrons to transition to the ground state, so the molecule exhibits a high luminescence along with a high mobility.

To demonstrate these traits, the researchers used the DPA semiconductor to fabricate (OLEDs) that highlight DPA's bright blue luminescence, as well as organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) that show DPA's good charge transport. They also integrated these two devices, creating an OFET-driven OLED array based on the same , DPA, to demonstrate the potential of using the new material in organic optoelectronics devices.

Explore further: New photoresist technology for organic semiconductors enabling submicron patterns

More information: Jie Liu, et al. "High mobility emissive organic semiconductor." Nature Communications. DOI: 10.1038/ncomms10032

© 2015 Phys.org



Powered By WizardRSS.com | Full Text RSS Feed
Share
  Section:  Articles - File Under:  Science  |  
 
Building the US big data machine PDF Print E-mail

The US National Science Foundation (NSF) just put $5 million (€4.68 million) into big data research, establishing four regional centers to advance innovation and spur collaboration across domains.   
Share
  Section:  Articles - File Under:  Science  |  
 
Dark matter: Seeing the unseen with supercomputers PDF Print E-mail

Way back in the 1930s, scientists observed evidence of an unseen force moving galaxies at a speed different than expected, dubbing it 'dark matter.' In 2015, scientists at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory used the Vulcan supercomputer to test a variant dark matter theory. Full testing of the theory awaits collider data, and might require exascale supercomputing for a complete analysis.
Share
  Section:  Articles - File Under:  Science  |  
 
Warning: Pacific Rim researchers are about to outpace you PDF Print E-mail

A happy product of an international collaboration between the Asia Pacific Advanced Network (APAN) and the US National Science Foundation (NSF), the TransPAC Pacific Wave 100G will be able to keep up with the large data sets fueling today's scientific discoveries.
Share
  Section:  Articles - File Under:  Science  |  
 
Standing on NASA’s shoulders PDF Print E-mail

Share
  Section:  Articles - File Under:  Science  |  
 
Mobile phone data helps predict dengue advance PDF Print E-mail

Researchers in Pakistan have shown that mobile phone data can be used to better understand how dengue fever spreads.
Share
  Section:  Articles - File Under:  Science  |  
 
Time traveling with El Niño PDF Print E-mail

Every two to seven years, the eastern tropical Pacific warms in an event known as El Niño. When meteorologists began comparing this year with the last major event in 1997, NCAR scientists performed side-by-side visualizations, and were shocked by what they saw.
Share
  Section:  Articles - File Under:  Science  |  
 
CARDIOPROOF – a ‘proof-of-concept’ for model-based cardiovascular prediction PDF Print E-mail

CARDIOPROOF aims to ascertain the applicability and effectiveness of predictive modelling and simulation tools for cardiology, validating them in interrelated clinical trials conducted in three European centers of excellence in cardiac treatment.
Share
  Section:  Articles - File Under:  Science  |  
 
Avoiding unconscious bias to enable diversity PDF Print E-mail

When Florence Hudson, a 30 year tech veteran who has worked with Grumman, NASA, and IBM, is still being talked down to, you know we've got a problem with gender expectations. Internet2 has launched a Gender Diversity Initiative to help reverse the trend, and with groups like the National Center for Women and Information Technology (NCWIT) and the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) on the rise, our unconscious biases are finally being addressed.
Share
  Section:  Articles - File Under:  Science  |  
 
Sifting big mobile phone data predicts your next move PDF Print E-mail

Like a scene out of an Orwell novel, an international team of researchers has mined millions of call detail records and can now predict your next move with a high degree of accuracy. Not to worry — your next move is not that far away anyway. The new abilities spell a great boon for location-based recommendations such as traffic management and urban planning.
Share
  Section:  Articles - File Under:  Science  |  
 
What if there was a little cat who was afraid of mice? PDF Print E-mail

A new European project is exploring computational creativity. It is working to engineer software that can take on some of the creative responsibility in arts and science projects.
Share
  Section:  Articles - File Under:  Science  |  
 
Gut feeling: XSEDE and TACC explore vascular disease PDF Print E-mail

Tens of thousands suffer from abdominal aortic aneurysms every year, too often with deadly consequences. Yale scientists looked to Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) supercomputers to model the flow of blood through the aorta. Their work is a crucial piece to solving this disease and saving patient lives.
Share
  Section:  Articles - File Under:  Science  |  
 
Research networks in Uganda on the upswing PDF Print E-mail

Leaving the dark ages of the bandwidth consortium in the past, the Research and Education Network of Uganda (RENU) is leading Ugandan networks into an age of enlightenment. Despite difficult terrain, low funding, and remote locations, RENU is connecting previously isolated researchers to the international community. The turnaround is virtually miraculous.
Share
  Section:  Articles - File Under:  Science  |  
 
Celebrating 10 years of the UbuntuNet Alliance PDF Print E-mail

The UbuntuNet Alliance is the research and education networking organization for eastern and southern Africa. November will mark 10 years since the alliance was formed at the World Summit on the Information Society in Tunis, Tunisia, in November 2005.
Share
  Section:  Articles - File Under:  Science  |  
 
Open data, open research, open scholarship PDF Print E-mail

Open scholarship is important for an open society and has the power to improve lives across the globe. However, achieving this vision may require the redesign, enhancement, or adaptation of the e-infrastructures used for conducting research and disseminating results.
Share
  Section:  Articles - File Under:  Science  |  
 
Hold an elephant in the palm of your hand PDF Print E-mail

Scientific artist Jonty Hurwitz creates the world's smallest sculptures. His latest work of art highlights the fragile state of the African elephant. Can art and science save the elephant from extinction?
Share
  Section:  Articles - File Under:  Science  |  
 
«StartPrev12345678910NextEnd»

Page 1 of 105
FNN Home Science
English (United Kingdom)
Why thousands of bees are flying around with sensors:  Wireless data-collecting sensors are everywhere: contact lenses, parking spaces, phones, clothes, trash, stores. The list could go on. So it's not surprising that they're now on honeyb...
Deluxe News Pro - Copyright 2009,2010 Monev Software LLC

ERS Broadcast Networks

ERS Broadcast Networks - Links