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Internet Television

This is Vudu Spark, Walmart’s very own Chromecast competitor 08 November 2014, 16.59 Internet Television
This is Vudu Spark, Walmart’s very own Chromecast competitor
Nov. 7, 2014 - 12:46 AM PST Nov. 7, 2014 - 12:46 AM PST Add Walmart to the list of companies that’s trying to sell you a Chromecast-like HDMI streaming stick: The retail giant’s Vudu streaming service is getting ready to
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Amazon Prime Instant gets unofficial Chromecast support with Primecast
Nov. 6, 2014 - 1:49 PM PST Nov. 6, 2014 - 1:49 PM PST Amazon Prime Instant is coming to Chromecast at last, thanks to two third-party developers: Amazon’s video streaming service doesn’t officially support Chromecast, but
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Social media and breaking news: Why authenticity trumps authority almost every time
Nov. 6, 2014 - 12:42 PM PST Nov. 6, 2014 - 12:42 PM PST There were a number of panels at the Web Summit in Dublin this week that talked about media and journalism, but the one that included VICE News, Time Inc. and Storyful was
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Aereo imposes large layoffs, but streaming TV service is not shutting down
Nov. 6, 2014 - 12:08 PM PST Nov. 6, 2014 - 12:08 PM PST Aereo’s bad year just got worse. The company said on Thursday that it will shut down its Boston office and lay off 43 employees, citing yet another adverse court ruling
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Does BuzzFeed engage in clickbait? That depends on your definition 08 November 2014, 16.59 Internet Television
Does BuzzFeed engage in clickbait? That depends on your definition
Nov. 7, 2014 - 11:38 AM PST Nov. 7, 2014 - 11:38 AM PST So BuzzFeed editor-in-chief Ben Smith wrote a post on Thursday about clickbait, a post that appears to have been triggered by a dismissive comment that Jon Stewart made
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Future News Reports

Obama's War Against US Energy Independence:  Give Away Oil Rich Alaskan Islands to Russia!
  By Joe Miller The Obama administration, despite the nation’s economic woes, effectively killed the job-producing Keystone Pipeline last month. The Arab Spring is turning the oil production of Libya and other Arab
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OSBIT Power's MaXccess system completes successful offshore trials 08 April 2012, 02.33 Administrator Energy
OSBIT Power's MaXccess system completes successful offshore trials
OSBIT Power's MaXccess system completes successful offshore trials Visit http://www.osbitpower.com for further information OSBIT Power (OP), Siemens Wind Power and Statoil have successfully completed offshore
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North America's EV charging infrastructure to get a boost 12 January 2012, 02.01 Administrator Energy
North America's EV charging infrastructure to get a boost
        North America’s EV charging infrastructure may soon see significant improvements, thanks to a recent agreement between Eaton Corporation and Coulomb Technologies. Under the deal, Eaton’s Level II and
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Could The Gravitomagnetic Field Be The Ultimate Energy Source? 28 May 2011, 01.34 Administrator Energy
Could The Gravitomagnetic Field Be The Ultimate Energy Source?
      Have scientists already unknowingly discovered the source for all atomic energy reactions, and could the discovery of the gravitomagnetic field be the ultimate energy source?  What if our understandings on how
Read More 5061 Hits 1 Rating
Physicists urge caution over apparent speed of light violation 25 September 2011, 16.27 Administrator Energy
Physicists urge caution over apparent speed of light violation
Physicists wary of junking light speed limit yet Physicist Antonio Ereditato poses before presenting the result of an experiment, which found a subatomic particle, the neutrino, seemed to move faster than the speed of
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STEORN ORBO  FREE ENERGY:  What's Next a Self Charging Unit for your Electric Car?
Steorn's Free Energy Orbo -- From Permanent Magnets to Solid State Systems   My associate, Hank Mills composed this for PESN, Saturday, February 12, 2011 6:17 Steorn is a small company based in Dublin, Ireland. For
Read More 5761 Hits 1 Rating
Cold Fusion, Releases Energy from Hydrogen's Gravitomagnetic Field 16 January 2011, 09.17 Administrator Energy
Cold Fusion, Releases Energy  from Hydrogen's Gravitomagnetic Field
Cold Fusion "In Bologna we did it" By Ilaria VENTURI, La Republica News, Bolona, Italy For the first time in Italy, in front of experts, the process was carried out using nickel and hydrogen. It 's the way to achieve
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Abu Dhabi Media Zone to generate renewable energy through its façade
Eco Factor: Sustainable development to generate renewable solar energy. Bernard Tschumi Architects have re-imagined their master plan for the new Abu Dhabi Media Zone, by incorporating several environmentally-friendly
Read More 2935 Hits 1 Rating

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National Novel Writing Month Heads Into 16th Year PDF Print E-mail

Thumbnail image for nanowrimo.pngFor some teachers, Halloween means candy, costumes, and the countdown to Thanksgiving break. For others, it means it's almost time to start 30 days of furious writing as part of National Novel Writing Month.

Now in its 16th year, National Novel Writing Month, or NaNoWriMo, challenges participants to write a 50,000-word novel in the month of November. With active forums, prep resources, and sponsored prizes for winners, NaNoWriMo aims to entice writers of all ages.

Students can and do participate in NaNoWriMo on their own—the forum dedicated to teens is one of the busiest on the main sitebut the organization also runs the Young Writers Program specifically for would-be novelists under 18.

YWP was founded at the request of teachers who wanted to get their students in on the action. The youth site allows writers to set their own word count goals, a boon to those who find 50,000 words to be a little intimidating. The site also provides moderated forums for kids and teens to talk to each other about plot points, character development, and more. In 2013, YWP boasted almost 90,000 participants, the majority them in one of 2,000 classrooms that took part.

To help with what can seem like a herculean task, YWP offers a wide selection of educator resources. Teachers can order a free classroom kit with buttons, stickers, and progress charts; set up virtual classrooms where they can monitor and communicate with their students; and even access detailed, common core-aligned lesson plans to use throughout November. Teachers can also connect with other participating classrooms across the globe.

Students and teachers also have access to free workbooks and regular "pep talks" from famous authors. This year's pep talk lineup includes Veronica Roth, author of the popular Divergent series, and fantasy writer Tamora Pierce. Past years have included talks by John Green, Kate DiCamillo, James Patterson, and more than 50 others.

A novel in a month may sound a little insane, but the main goal of NaNoWriMo is actually for writers to start a project, even if they don't necessarily finish it. For teachers trying to work more creative writing into their students' routines, it's one tool that might come in handy.

Image courtesy of National Novel Writing Month

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  Section:  Articles - File Under:  Education  |  
 
In Classrooms, Halloween Costumes Can Raise Sensitive Issues PDF Print E-mail

As Halloween draws closer, students (and some teachers!) are busy picking out their costumes. Unfortunately, students don't always pick the most appropriate costumes. Teachers could be in a position to help change that.

Adrienne Keene, a post-doc researcher in Native American studies at Brown University and the author of the blog "Native Appropriations," is used to talking about costumes. She publishes an annual post detailing the reasons it's not appropriate to dress as a Native American for Halloween, though she notes that the same arguments can be applied to other races. Her summary of the issue? "Native peoples are a contemporary, LIVING group of people, not a costume ... Stop putting us in the same category as wizards and clowns."

One of the more pointed responses this issue comes in the form of the "We're a Culture, Not a Costume" campaign, which was started in 2011 by a student organization at Ohio University. The campaign features posters pointing out that while white students can put on a costume for one night, people of color can never escape those stereotypes.

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Lest you think that the trend of wearing racially or otherwise insensitive costumes is confined to adults and college students, note that stores and online retailers still sell costumes so that children can dress as Indians, Gypsies, and "Little Amigos." One child's parents even dressed him as Ray Rice, the Baltimore Ravens running back suspended this fall by the National Football League for domestic violence. And of course, teens generally pick their Halloween costumes from the adult section.

Talking about costume choices isn't necessarily part of the job description for teachers. However, teacher AD Midd notes that they can present an opportunity to talk about bigger issues: "The problem that racial stereotypes present is that they are borne of ignorance and silence." By talking about stereotyped costumes, she says, "we enter into a conversation about tolerance, speaking up for one another and our shared social environment."

What can teachers do about this? In schools that host Halloween parties or allow costumes, it's relatively easy for teachers to notice inappropriate costumes in their classes and quietly have a word with the student (or, in lower grades, their parents). Some schools even limit students' costume choices or give them an educational twist. For example, one Connecticut school lets students dress as their favorite literary characters during the school's Fall Fest.

In schools that ban costumes, however, and those that don't celebrate Halloween—an increasingly common trendteachers may want to take a preemptive approach. Midd suggests using journal prompts to approach the issue in classes where such an assignment is appropriate.

If all else fails, CollegeHumor created a tongue-in-cheek but largely accurate flowchart last year that helps students figure out if their costume is racist. BuzzFeed has one too, to determine when blackface is acceptable in a costume. Spoiler alert: Never.

Images of "We're a Culture, Not a Costume" posters from Ohio University STARS.

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Role Reversal Shows Teacher What It Means to Be a Student PDF Print E-mail

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« District Phasing Out Swingsets, Citing Safety Concerns | Main | In Classrooms, Halloween Costumes Can Raise Sensitive Issues »

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Despite countless hours spent at school, many teachers only ever see their classroom from one perspective: the front. Veteran teacher Alexis Wiggins decided to change that, shadowing two students at the high school where she now works as a learning coach.

The experience was eye-opening: After only two days, she had realized that she had no idea what the student experience was truly like. In a blog post published earlier this month, Wiggins explains that most of what she learned can be boiled down to one main idea: being a student is a long, boring experience. After years of being constantly on her feet and in motion, Wiggins says she suddenly found herself being asked to sit still for an entire day, often passive, and realized that students had almost no influence on what they were being taught.

To her surprise, all of that sitting quietly was exhausting:

By the end of the day, I could not stop yawning and I was desperate to move or stretch ... I was drained, and not in a good, long, productive-day kind of way.

Wiggins noted that she also discovered some of her blind spots as a teacher. She found that as a student, she felt "a little bit like a nuisance." She was constantly reminded to sit down and pay attention and was the target of the same sort of sarcasm she had employed in her own classes.

Though Wiggins works at a private school overseas, students and teachers in American schools can probably relate on some level. Her comments are echoed in a follow-up post written by her father, Grant Wiggins, who published the original post on his blog.

Maybe not all teachers can take a day off to shadow their students, but the idea of taking a walk in a student's shoes is an interesting one. Clearly even experienced teachers can learn something new when they put themselves in a different role. 

Image from Pixabay/Creative Commons

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District Phasing Out Swingsets, Citing Safety Concerns PDF Print E-mail

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A Washington state school district plans to remove swing sets from playgrounds due to safety concerns.

Earlier this month, the Richland School District, in Washington, announced its plans to eventually remove swings from school playgrounds. There are only two swingsets left at elementary school playgrounds, and those are expected to be phased out in the next five years. While some news sources have called it a "ban," it's not actually because of a legal edict.

In the past decade, the district has been slowly replacing playground equipment, and in the process has not put in new swing sets. Richland School District spokesperson Steve Aagard points to the unsafe nature of swings as the reason to phase out the equipment.

"Swings have been determined to be the most unsafe of all the playground equipment on a playground," he said. "It's a litigation issue, with kids falling off swings."

The other issue would be the students who might wander into the path of swinging children.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 200,000 children are admitted annually to the emergency room for injuries sustained on a playground, and swings make up about 40 percent of playground-related injuries.

Some parents lament the death of what they see as a childhood playground symbol. Richland resident Gail Thorricellas told Komonews that she loved playing on swings as a child.

"They were our great joy, and we all played on them," she said. "I truly can't remember anyone being hurt."

Other parents are happy to see the swings go. Parent Muge Kaineoz has a daughter at a Richland school and is glad she doesn't have to worry about swing-related injuries

"When she starts elementary school, those swings can get crazy," she said. Kaineoz added that she once witnessed a toddler walk in front of a moving swing. "By the time you could do something about it, she was knocked out."

Image by Loren Kerns/Flickr Creative Commons. 

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Philadelphia Contract Cancellation Sparks Protests, Rebuttals PDF Print E-mail

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Updated

Two weeks after Philadelphia canceled its contract with the local teachers' union, officials in all involved parties continue to seek legal recourse.

In a cost-cutting move, the Philadelphia School Reform Commission unilaterally canceled the district's contract with the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers in a special meeting on Oct. 6. The contract change will require teachers to pay for health-care premiums, when teachers of the union previously paid nothing for health care.

The district filed legal action to grant special powers to the SRC, allowing for contract revisions, according to The Notebook. There is a debate over whether or not the SRC has power to do so. The PFT plans to challenge the SRC's contract cancellation in court.

"The manner that they did it in is outrageous," said PFT spokesperson George Jackson, referring to the quickly announced meeting that was sparsely attended. "We're going to fight this." 

The district and the union had been negotiating terms since the union's contract expired in 2013, but had not come to any conclusions. The district then decided to move forward and cancel contracts altogether.

According to a press release written by Jerry Jordan, president of the PFT, Philadelphia teachers are paid far less than their suburban counterparts and, much like teachers around the nation, pay thousands of dollars for school supplies every year out of their own pockets. Adding another expense by forcing teachers to pay for health care would continue to chip away at Philadelphia's teachers' incomes, he said.

Jordan stated that Philadelphia elementary teachers make an average salary of $68,600 and middle and high school teachers make an average of $72,200. He also noted that teachers have forgone pay increases for two years in a row.

He said in a news conference after the meeting: "We are not indentured servants."

Parents and other advocates protested last Wednesday to show support for the city's teachers, with some students saying the were worried that the contract cancellation will drive great teachers away from the district. 

In an interview with The New York Times, Keith Dorsey, a parent with a child in a district school, said charging teachers for health benefits "is robbing the children."

The district, however, defends its contract cancellation due to budget constraints. The city faces an $81 million deficit and has been searching for ways to close it. Teachers paying for health care would generate about $44 million this school year, closing the budget gap.

William R. Hite Jr., superintendent of the district, said in an interview with The New York Times: "We have to share sacrifices in order to navigate this challenging fiscal time that we are working through." The district has said that the money would go back into classrooms, providing teachers and students with the resources they desperately need.

Governor Tom Corbett said in a statement that the additional funding will provide the district with "the ability to hire new teachers, counselors, and nurses, and secure educational resources that will benefit the students of Philadelphia." Principals will be able to make financial decisions to increase staff or pay for after-school programs.

Corbett has previously been criticized for slashing education funding. According to the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center, Corbett has cut close to $1 billion from Pennsylvania's education budget. Corbett's critics believe his education cuts are the cause of the fight between the union and district now. 

Both the union and the district are trying to come off as the group with students' needs in mind. While the union stands for teachers' rights and calls for smaller class sizes, the district says this additional funding simply makes teachers pay for benefits, much like other professionals, while giving money back directly to schools. 

[Updated:The Philadelphia Federation of Teachers has won a temporary injunction, postponing the requirement that teachers pay for their own premiums.]

Image from Wistechcolleges/Flickr Creative Commons

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Teacher: Adolescent Readers Shouldn't Be Sheltered From Literature PDF Print E-mail

3319626950_d86eab3f78_b.jpgGood writing can make you cry, and that's something students can benefit from, Colorado 6th grade language arts teacher Alicia Urie writes in a Center for Teaching Quality blog.

Urie recounts her experiences teaching The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton, saying that the novel's themes of loyalty, nonconformity, and finding similarities among different groups resonate with her middle school students. Through good writing, she argues, kids can gain a new outlook of the world.

It will help give you a lens to human experiences you wouldn't otherwise have; but most importantly, good writing will change you. It will shift your perspective. It will make you an engaged participant in society.

Urie says that last year, she received a request from a student's mother for an alternate reading assignment due to concerns about the content of The Outsiders. The violence depicted in the book, the mother said, made her daughter cry while reading.

The mother's request is not surprising, since The Outsiders has been frequently challenged in the past, according to the American Library Association. Reasons for banning the book include its portrayal of gang violence, underage smoking and drinking, strong language, and family dysfunction.

Although Urie gave the student another book to read, she felt that her student was missing out on a valuable learning experience—a chance "to find a deeper connection to herself and her classmates through the content of this book"—that may have been worth the passing emotional distress.

She commits to taking a different tact to such parental requests in the future:

So, I would say to my concerned parents in the future, "Mom, let's not shelter your daughter from accessing the tools she will need to have a voice in this world. Let's give her a text that she can use as a lens for viewing this human existence.  Let's allow her to feel and think and become part of all of it. By reading The Outsiders she can learn unforgettable themes.  And guess what?  The world doesn't even have to end."

Image: TheeErin/Flickr Creative Commons.

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The MaKey MaKey might change the game PDF Print E-mail

By Trevor Shaw
Read more by
October 8th, 2014

A new tool opens up a variety of creative possibilities for students

makey-makeyTell me if this sounds familiar…

You want to increase student buy-in on a project by designing a challenge with a connection to the “real world.” You want your students to see their work as authentic and not just an academic exercise, but as you brainstorm project ideas with your students, you quickly realize that the things they view as “real” projects require background knowledge that is far beyond their current skills.

When your sixth grade student tells you she wants to create new type of video game controller so that her disabled brother can play video games with her, you might consider all of the concepts of electronics that would have to go into such an invention. You might think about the need to program a microcontroller or concepts such as digital logic or serial communication. You would then feel torn between telling this student to abandon an incredibly motivating, personally engaging project, or encouraging her to press on, knowing that she will almost certainly flounder for weeks before giving up in frustration.

The challenge for many teachers is that there is a gap between the types of real problems that allow students to find authenticity in their learning and the background knowledge and competence required to engage in solving those problems. It reminds me of all the “science labs” I used to do as a student. If we were following a prescribed set of steps toward a predetermined outcome, these labs felt more like a cooking class than real scientific work. But the reason for this was that none of us had enough scientific knowledge to cure a disease or discover a new molecule.

It is precisely this problem that Jay Silver and Eric Rosenbaum of the MIT Media Lab have solved with their invention, the MaKey MaKey.

(Next page: The MaKey MaKey’s potential)

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3 ways technology buoys at-risk students PDF Print E-mail

3 ways technology buoys at-risk students

By Laura Devaney, Managing Editor, @eSN_Laura
Read more by
October 7th, 2014

Educational technology can greatly improve outcomes for at-risk students if implemented correctly

technology-scopeInteractive learning and other technology-enabled strategies can increase engagement and significantly improve achievement among at-risk students, according to a new report from the Alliance for Excellent Education (AEE) and the Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education (SCOPE).

When properly implemented, three aspects of educational technology combine to support at-risk high school students: interactive learning, use of technology to explore and create rather than to “drill and kill,” and the proper blend of teachers and technology, according to the report, authored by Stanford Professor and SCOPE Faculty Director Linda Darling-Hammond, Stanford Professor Shelley Goldman, and doctoral student Molly B. Zielezinski.

Interactive strategies in technology use “produce greater success than the use of computers for programmed instruction,” according to the report. This kind of approach lets students explore learning concepts and ideas in an active manner, instead of requiring students to receive information from a computer in a passive manner.

(Next page: What educators can learn about technology’s impact on at-risk students)

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New tech offers virtual field trip to an aquarium tank PDF Print E-mail

By Cynthia Sewell
Read more by
September 29th, 2014

Visitors can control a mini-submarine for an up-close perspective

virtual-fieldA Boise, Idaho, company is taking armchair adventuring and learning to a new level by letting anyone on the internet take command of a remotely operated underwater vehicle.

The LiveDiver device from Reach-In is now installed at the Aquarium of Boise. By logging into the aquarium’s website, users can control a small mini-submarine in the shark and fish tank to get a diver’s perspective of the marine life.

Visitors can even snap pictures of the finned critters–if Letterman the puffer fish will let them. But more on him later.

Reach-In’s first public-access venture was iPet Companion, which let users play with cats in 13 animal shelters across the country, including the Idaho Humane Society, by controlling robotic toys over the internet.

(Next page: Take a virtual field trip–underwater)

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Computer News Reports

Microsoft looks to find its way in app market via free Office deal
By unlocking core edit functions in its free Office apps for iOS and, later, Android, Microsoft is trying to close out pesky rivals in the mobile market and lure new subscribers to Office 365. Accomplishing those goals is
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Motorola may have won the 'First to Lollipop' prize with the new Moto X
Florence Ion Happy Friday, Android users! And if you’re currently sporting the second-generation Moto X, you’re in for a treat. Motorola said it would deploy Android Lollipop quickly, and boy, did it deliver. Motorola
Read More 264 Hits 0 Ratings
AT&T extends network to Mexico with $2.5 billion lusacell acquisition
AT&T will pay US$2.5 billion to acquire Mexican wireless company lusacell, in a major push to expand its coverage and improve mobile Internet service for those living south of the U.S. border. The acquisition,
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Biggest ever Tor raid hits 410 underground sites; 17 arrested
Coordinated raids by law enforcement agencies in the U.S. and 16 European countries have closed hundreds of underground websites, including dozens dealing in weapons and drugs, and led to the arrest of 17 people. The raids
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Intel’s 'Broadwell Unlimited' enthusiast chip might face heavy competition (from Intel)
Intel The CPU that Intel never planned to make in the first place may be actually be getting its day in the sun—just in time to have it collide with its replacement chip. The CPU in question, codenamed “Broadwell
Read More 275 Hits 0 Ratings
How to create a high-quality animated GIF 08 November 2014, 16.57 Computers
How to create a high-quality animated GIF
Graphics & design software Even with all the video streaming options available to us today, there’s nothing that can match the weird, mesmerizing quality of a good animated GIF. That’s why no matter where you go on
Read More 274 Hits 0 Ratings
Lenovo recruits Ashton Kutcher to unveil its new Yoga 3 Pro and ThinkPad Yoga 14
It’s been a full year since Lenovo announced it had signed up Ashton Kutcher as a “product engineer,” and Lenovo is apparently happy with the partnership. The actor/investor is to appear via satellite at a Lenovo
Read More 405 Hits 0 Ratings
New Lenovo Yoga tablet hides a surprise: A projector for impromptu movie nights
Lenovo Lenovo’s newest Yoga tablet can create an epic movie night. The Yoga Tablet 2 Pro, one of two Android tablets the company is announcing Thursday in London, has a projector built right into its hinge that can
Read More 426 Hits 0 Ratings
Sony’s PS4 game streaming Xperia Z3v lands on Verizon Oct. 23 for $199 on contract
Florence Ion Sony announced Thursday that it’s finally bringing one of its Android-powered smartphones to more than one carrier in the U.S. Verizon Wireless will be the second carrier ever to offer one of Sony’s
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Holograms and 3D porn: Expert predictions for a gigabit Internet
“Vivid” telepresence—holograms, immersive gaming, new collaboration services and even 3D pornography—could be the next big thing as gigabit-per-second broadband service spreads across the U.S. Enhanced telepresence
Read More 424 Hits 0 Ratings
Microsoft updates Skype for Windows, Mac with new chat interface
Microsoft Chatting in Skype for Windows and the Mac now looks more like the Windows Phone version, whether you like it or not. Microsoft's Skype announced version 7.0 for the Mac together with a new preview version for the
Read More 426 Hits 0 Ratings
Android SMS worm Selfmite returns, more aggressive than ever
A new version of an Android worm called Selfmite has the potential to ramp up huge SMS charges for victims in its attempt to spread to as many devices as possible. The first version of Selfmite was discovered in June, but
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Oculus Rift 'Crescent Bay' prototype hands-on: A VR alien waved at me and I waved back
We don't really like to swear on this site. By and large PCWorld is a family-friendly affair. Which is a shame, because at Oculus Connect on Saturday I got hands-on time with Crescent Bay, the latest internal Oculus Rift
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New Oculus Rift 'Crescent Bay' prototype packs integrated audio and 360-degree tracking
Kicking off day two of the Oculus Connect virtual reality conference in Los Angeles, CA, Oculus CEO Brendan Iribe took to the stage to announce a new Crescent Bay prototype—not the consumer release nor another developer
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Oculus open-sources original Rift developer kit's firmware, schematics, and mechanics
Kicking off the Oculus Connect conference in Los Angeles this weekend, Oculus's Nirav Patel announced that the original Oculus Rift developer kit (DK1) is now fully open-source, with the exception of the pieces that aren't
Read More 368 Hits 0 Ratings
IEEE standards group wants to bring order to IoT 20 September 2014, 19.54 Computers
IEEE standards group wants to bring order to IoT
The IEEE is embarking on an ambitious effort to build a overarching architecture for the Internet of Things, spanning a multitude of industries and technologies. IEEE P2413, which the Institute of Electrical and
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Samsung launches free'My Knox' app for securing its latest smartphones
Samsung on Thursday announced price reductions and updates for its Knox security and management software for IT shops and a free My Knox service that is directly available to professionals using ActiveSync. My Knox can be
Read More 393 Hits 0 Ratings
InfiniDB going out of business, but its database will live on as open source
Increasingly stiff competition in the database market has claimed another victim, as InfiniDB has ceased operations effective immediately with plans to file for bankruptcy. “The company and technology have developed over
Read More 349 Hits 0 Ratings
Apple Watch under scrutiny for privacy by Connecticut attorney general
The attorney general of the U.S. state of Connecticut is concerned about the privacy implications of Apple Watch’s handling of consumers’ health information. In a letter to Apple CEO Tim Cook, George Jepsen has asked
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Data loss detection tool mines the ephemeral world of 'pastes'
It’s not easy to figure out if your data has been collected by hackers, but an online tool has been expanded to hunt through one of the most prolific sources of leaked data, known as “pastes.” The most well-known
Read More 443 Hits 0 Ratings
'Tiny banker' malware targets US financial institutions 15 September 2014, 21.19 Computers
'Tiny banker' malware targets US financial institutions
A banking trojan, known for its small size but powerful capabilities, has expanded the number of financial institutions it can collect data from, according to security vendor Avast. Tiny Banker, also known as Tinba, was
Read More 398 Hits 0 Ratings
Wi-Fi group acts to simplify peer-to-peer video, printing and other tasks
The Wi-Fi Direct standard for linking two devices without a LAN is about to get easier to use. Wi-Fi Direct is the peer-to-peer version of the hugely popular wireless technology that the Wi-Fi Alliance has now been
Read More 430 Hits 0 Ratings
Facebook open sources its mcrouter data-caching tool 15 September 2014, 21.19 Computers
Facebook open sources its mcrouter data-caching tool
Facebook is releasing mcrouter, its software for turning many cache servers around the world into one distributed system, as open source. The company announced the release on Monday at its @Scale conference in San
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Yahoo slams new 'digital will' law, says users have privacy when they die
What should happen to your personal digital communications—emails, chats, photos and the like—after you die? Should they be treated like physical letters for the purposes of a will? Yahoo doesn’t think so. The
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Grail Returns First Video from Far Side Of The Moon:         MoonKAM, or Moon Knowledge Acquired by Middle school students, will be used by students nationwide to select lunar images for study.  A camera aboard one of NASA's twin ...
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